Nutrimuscle Forum : Mobile & Tablette

Les omega 3 améliorent les fonctions cérébrales

Actualités sport, fitness & musculation, vidéos des pros, études scientifiques. Discutez avec la communauté Nutrimuscle et partagez votre expérience...

Modérateurs: Nutrimuscle-Conseils, Nutrimuscle-Diététique

Les omega 3 améliorent les fonctions cérébrales

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 20 Avr 2013 08:09

Do omega-3 fats boost brain function in adults? Are we any closer to an answer?
Alan D Dangour Am J Clin Nutr May 2013 vol. 97 no. 5 909-910

DHA is particularly abundant in brain tissues, and mechanistic data suggest multiple potential roles for DHA in neuronal health (1). It is therefore not surprising that DHA, and a second long-chain omega-3 (n–3) fat, EPA, which are both commonly found in oily fish, are frequently cited as modifiers of cognitive function (2). Several, although by no means all, observational studies report positive associations of omega-3 fatty acid intake with cognition in both children and adults. To date, the majority of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in adults on the potential benefits of EPA and DHA supplementation have been conducted in older people, in the hope of slowing age-related cognitive decline and preventing dementia. The available RCTs currently provide no evidence of benefit for cognitive function from EPA and DHA supplementation among cognitively healthy older people (3).

In this issue of the Journal, Stonehouse et al (4) report the findings of a small RCT in New Zealand in which 228 adults aged 18–45 y were randomly assigned to receive either 1.2 g DHA or placebo daily for 6 mo. The primary stated aim of the trial was to identify whether DHA supplementation would improve cognitive function. The trial included only adults who reported habitually consuming small amounts of oily fish, thereby making them a population who could potentially benefit from additional DHA in their diet. This was clearly not an easy trial to manage: slightly more than 20% of randomly assigned participants left the study over 6 mo, and these dropouts tended to be significantly younger than those participants who completed the study. Furthermore, the supplements appear to have been rather hard to stomach: nearly 50% of the intervention arm reported mild side effects (compared with 20% in the placebo arm). There were, however, several strengths to the study including the impressively standardized manner in which the computer-based cognitive testing was conducted.

This is the first robustly designed study to test the hypothesis that provision of supplemental DHA in young adults with habitually low dietary DHA intake will boost cognitive performance, and the findings are potentially important. Six months after randomization, serum DHA status was significantly enhanced in the intervention but not in the placebo arm, and the intervention arm scored better than the placebo arm in 2 measures of cognitive function, namely the reaction times of working and episodic memory. Unfortunately, the confidence that can be placed in the study conclusions is severely limited by 2 important issues, one to do with the conduct and reporting of trials and the other to do with assessment methods in trials on cognitive function.

First, and probably most important in the modern era of RCTs, the way in which the trial has been reported leaves considerable uncertainty for the reader. We do not know what primary endpoint was defined a priori by the study investigators: this critical information is not provided in the article nor on the trial register (we were unable to find a published trial protocol). There are now very clear guidelines on the preparation and publication of high-quality study protocols to facilitate the conduct and review of trials (4). These guidelines highlight the critical importance of clearly specifying trial outcomes at the protocol stage so that any reporting biases can be identified and deterred (4). Similarly, there are very clear guidelines on transparent reporting of trials (5). The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) guidelines require “completely defined pre-specified primary and secondary outcome measures” (5).

The lack of an apparently prespecified primary outcome has resulted in the investigators reporting statistical tests on multiple cognitive function outcomes. CONSORT states that “authors should exercise special care when evaluating the results of trials with multiple comparisons [....] In such circumstances, some statistically significant findings are likely to result from chance alone” (5). Indeed, Table 4 in Stonehouse et al's article (4) reports the results of 25 statistical tests of main effects (some but not all sex disaggregated) and of treatment × sex and treatment × APOE interactions, and with this number of tests we would expect to find 1 to 2 significant findings purely by chance. The omission of a prespecified primary outcome in the trial by Stonehouse et al (4) is extremely unfortunate; it significantly reduces confidence in the headline findings and clearly also means that the trial has not been reported according to CONSORT guidelines.

Our second major concern relates to a collective need for investigators working in the area of cognitive function to think more clearly about the tests used to assess cognitive function in adults. Stonehouse et al (4) reported improvements in reaction times for episodic and working memory as a result of supplementation. A rapid review of studies published in the Journal in 2011 and 2012 that investigated cognitive outcomes in adults (n = 10) identified that 29 different cognitive tests were reported and that, of the studies that reported a primary outcome, no 2 studies reported the same primary outcome. Is this a sensible way to proceed? Which of the reported primary outcomes is of the greatest consequence for cognitive health and which is the most clinically relevant? In 2008 an expert group attempted to define outcomes for primary and secondary prevention trials in Alzheimer disease (6) but was unable to select an outcome to be used universally when assessing cognitive decline in primary prevention trials because of a lack of a sufficiently developed knowledge base.

We would suggest that there is an urgent need for experts in cognitive function testing to transparently and objectively propose a small set of outcomes to use in trials on cognitive outcomes in adults. This set of tests could then be used in future trials to at last allow some cross-study comparisons and significantly advance the field. However, until such time as we have greater clarity on the best cognitive tests to use, we would urge that all trials should publish their protocols according to the new Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials guidelines and that all trials should be reported according to the internationally recognized CONSORT guidelines.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 38811
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 20 Avr 2013 08:19

DHA supplementation improved both memory and reaction time in healthy young adults: a randomized controlled trial
Welma Stonehouse Am J Clin Nutr May 2013 vol. 97 no. 5 1134-1143

Background: Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is important for brain function, and its status is dependent on dietary intakes. Therefore, individuals who consume diets low in omega-3 (n−3) polyunsaturated fatty acids may cognitively benefit from DHA supplementation. Sex and apolipoprotein E genotype (APOE) affect cognition and may modulate the response to DHA supplementation.

Objectives: We investigated whether a DHA supplement improves cognitive performance in healthy young adults and whether sex and APOE modulate the response.

Design: Healthy adults (n = 176; age range: 18–45 y; nonsmoking and with a low intake of DHA) completed a 6-mo randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind intervention in which they consumed 1.16 g DHA/d or a placebo. Cognitive performance was assessed by using a computerized cognitive test battery. For all tests, z scores were calculated and clustered into cognitive domains as follows: episodic and working memory, attention, reaction time (RT) of episodic and working memory, and attention and processing speed. ANCOVA was conducted with sex and APOE as independent variables.

Results: RTs of episodic and working memory improved with DHA compared with placebo [mean difference (95% CI): −0.18 SD (−0.33, −0.03 SD) (P = 0.02) and −0.36 SD (−0.58, −0.14 SD) (P = 0.002), respectively]. Sex × treatment interactions occurred for episodic memory (P = 0.006) and the RT of working memory (P = 0.03). Compared with the placebo, DHA improved episodic memory in women [0.28 SD (0.08, 0.48 SD); P = 0.006] and RTs of working memory in men [−0.60 SD (−0.95, −0.25 SD); P = 0.001]. APOE did not affect cognitive function, but there were some indications of APOE × sex × treatment interactions.

Conclusions: DHA supplementation improved memory and the RT of memory in healthy, young adults whose habitual diets were low in DHA. The response was modulated by sex.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 38811
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 22 Avr 2013 13:58

Traduction de l'étude : :wink:
Est-ce que les oméga-3 booste le fonctionnement du cerveau chez l’adulte ? Sommes-nous proche de la réponse ?

La DHA est particulièrement abondante dans les tissus du cerveau, et les données mécaniques suggèrent que la DHA possède plusieurs rôles sur la santé neuronale (1). Il n’est donc pas surprenant que la DHA, et un second acide gras à longue chaîne oméga-3, l’EPA, qui se trouvent dans les poissons gras, sont fréquemment cités comme modificateurs de la fonction cognitive (2). Plusieurs, mais certainement pas toutes, études observationnelles rapportent des associations positives d‘un apport en acides gras oméga-3 sur la fonction cognitive chez les enfants et adultes. A ce jour, la majorité des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) chez l’adulte, rapporte des avantages potentiels de la supplémentation en EPA et DHA chez des personnes âgées, dans l’espoir de ralentir le déclin cognitif lié à l’âge et prévenir ainsi la démence. Les ECR disponibles ne fournissent actuellement aucun signe de bénéfice sur la fonction cognitive lors d’une supplémentation en EPA et DHA chez des personnes âgées cognitivement saines (3).

Dans le numéro de ce journal, le rapport des résultats de l’étude de Stonehouse et al (4), portait sur une population de Nouvelle-Zélande de 228 adultes âgés de 18-45 ans ont été groupés pour recevoir soit 1,2 g de DHA par jour ou un placebo pendant 6 mois. L’objectif de l’essai était de déterminer si la supplémentation en DHA pourrait améliorer la fonction cognitive. L’essai comprenait seulement les adultes qui ont déclaré consommer de faibles quantités de poissons gras, rendant une supplémentation en DHA bénéfique. Ce n’est pas un défi facile à gérer : un peu plus de 20 % des participants de l’étude ont quitté celle-ci sur une période de 6 mois, et ces abandons sont surtout des personnes plus jeunes que les personnes qui ont terminé l’étude. En outre, les suppléments, semblent avoir été plus dur à avaler : près de 50% des participants ont rapporté des effets secondaires bénins (contre 20% dans le groupe placebo). Il y avait, cependant, plusieurs points forts à l’étude, y compris la manière impressionnante dans lequel le test cognitif informatique a été mené.

Il s’agit de la première étude significative qui évalue l’hypothèse selon laquelle la prise de suppléments de DHA chez de jeunes adultes ayant habituellement un faible apport alimentaire en DHA va stimuler les performances cognitives, et les résultats sont significatifs. Six mois après l’étude, le statut de DHA a été considérablement amélioré dans le groupe supplémenté mais pas dans le groupe placebo, et le groupe supplémenté a mieux réagit que le groupe placebo, dans le temps de réaction de la mémoire et la mémoire épisodique. Malheureusement, le degré de confiance aux conclusions de cette étude, est sévèrement mis en doute par deux questions importantes, l’une sur la conduite et le rapport des essais et l’autre sur la méthode d’évaluation des essais sur la fonction cognitive.

Premièrement, et c’est probablement le plus important dans l’ère moderne d’ECR, la manière dont l’essai a été rapporté laisse planer un doute considérable pour le lecteur. Nous ne savons pas si le critère d’évaluation principal de l’étude a été défini par les auteurs de l’étude : cette information essentielle n’est pas reprise dans l’article ni dans le registre des essais (nous n’avons pas pu trouver la publication d’un protocole d’essai). Il y a maintenant des lignes directrices très claires sur la préparation et la publication des protocoles d’étude pour faciliter la conduite et l’étude des essais (4). Ces lignes directrices soulignent l’importance cruciale de préciser clairement les résultats d’essais au stade de protocole ainsi que les déclarations qui peuvent être confirmées ou infirmées (4). De même, il existe des directives très claires sur la transparence des rapports d’essais (5). Les Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) des lignes directrices exigent "complètement définies les mesures de résultats primaires et secondaires pré-spécifiés» (5).

L’absence d’un critère d’évaluation principal précédant le début de l’étude a entraîné les enquêteurs présentent les tests statistiques sur de multiples conclusions de la fonction cognitive. CONSORT stipule que « les auteurs doivent particulièrement faire attention lors de l’évaluation des résultats des essais avec des comparaisons multiples [....] Dans de telles circonstances, certains résultats significatifs sont susceptibles de résulter du simple hasard (5). En effet, le tableau 4 dans l’article de Stonehouse et Al (4) présente les résultats de 25 tests statistiques des effets principaux (certains mais pas tous différenciés par sexe) et de traitementx sexe et traitementx interactions APOE, et avec ce nombre de tests on pourrait s’attendre à trouver 1 à 2 conclusions importantes par hasard. L’omission d’un résultat principal prédéfini dans le travail de Stonehouse et Al (4) est extrêmement regrettable, il réduit considérablement la confiance dans les résultats de titre et signifie clairement que le travail n’a pas respecté les lignes directrices du CONSORT.

Notre deuxième préoccupation majeure concerne un besoin collectif des chercheurs travaillant dans le domaine de la fonction cognitive de penser plus clairement sur les tests utilisés pour évaluer la fonction cognitive chez les adultes. Suite à la supplémentation, Stonehouse et al (4) ont signalé une amélioration des temps de réaction de la mémoire épisodique et de travail. Un examen rapide des études publiées dans le journal en 2011 et 2012, qui a enquêté sur les résultats cognitifs chez des adultes (n=10) ont identifié que 29 tests cognitifs différents, avec des études avec des résultats primaires, Est-ce une façon raisonnable de procéder? Lequel des principaux résultats rapportés est de plus grande importance pour la santé cognitive et qui est le plus cliniquement pertinent? En 2008, un groupe d'experts a tenté de définir les résultats des essais pour la prévention primaire et secondaire dans la maladie d'Alzheimer (6), mais a été incapable de sélectionner un résultat digne d’être utilisé universellement pour évaluer le déclin cognitif dans les essais de prévention primaire en raison de l'absence d'une base de connaissances suffisamment développé.

Nous suggérons qu’il existe un besoin urgent d’experts dans les tests de fonction cognitive de manière transparente et objective afin de proposer une petite série de test à utiliser sur les résultats cognitifs chez des adultes. Cette série de tests pourrait être utilisée dans les essais futurs pour permettre enfin quelques comparaisons entre les études et de faire progresser de manière significative les connaissances sur ce terrain. Cependant, à partir du moment où nous avons une plus grande clarté sur les meilleurs tests cognitifs à utiliser, nous demandons instamment que tous les travaux doivent être publié avec leurs protocoles selon le nouveau protocole standard : suivre les recommandations des lignes directrices d’essai et que tous les essais doivent être conforme et reconnus par CONSORT.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 3836
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 22 Avr 2013 14:20

Traduction de l'étude : :wink:

La supplémentation en DHA améliore la mémoire et le temps de réaction chez le jeune adulte en bonne santé : résultat d’un essai contrôlé et randomisé.

Contexte : l’acide docosahexaénoïque (DHA) est important pour le fonctionnement du cerveau, et son statut dépend de l’apport alimentaire. Et donc, les personnes qui en consomment peu, auront un bénéfice cognitif à se supplémenter. Le sexe et le génotype apolipoprotéine E (APOE) affectent la cognition et peuvent influencer la réponse à une supplémentation en DHA.

Conception : des adultes en bonne santé (n = 176; tranche d'âge: 18-45 ans; non-fumeurs et avec un faible apport en DHA) ont pris pendant 6 mois, avec la présence d’un placebo, 1.16g de DHA/jour ou un placebo. La performance cognitive a été évaluée en utilisant une batterie de tests cognitifs informatisés. Pour tous les tests, z scores ont été calculés et regroupés en domaines cognitifs comme suit : la mémoire épisodique, de travail, l’attention, le temps de réaction (RT) de la mémoire épisodique et de travail, et l’attention et la vitesse de traitement. ANCOVA a été réalisée avec le sexe et APOE comme variables indépendantes.

Résultats : RTS de la mémoire épisodique et de travail sont améliorés avec une supplémentation de DHA par rapport au placebo [différence moyenne (IC à 95%): -0.18 SD (-0.33, -0.03 SD) (P = 0,02) et -0.36 SD (-0.58, -0.14 SD) (P = 0,002), respectivement]. Le sexe x interactions de traitement a eu lieu pour la mémoire épisodique (P = 0,006) et le RT de la mémoire de travail (P = 0,03).
En comparaison avec le placebo, le DHA améliore la mémoire épisodique chez les femmes [0,28 SD (0,08, 0,48 SD), P = 0,006] et RTS de la mémoire de travail chez les hommes [-0.60 SD (-0.95, -0.25 SD), p = 0,001]. APOE n'a pas d'incidence sur la fonction cognitive, mais il y avait certaines indications de l'APOE × sexe × interactions de traitement.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 3836
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus


Retourner vers Actualités, vidéos, études scientifiques

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: Aucun utilisateur enregistré et 3 invités