Nutrimuscle Forum : Mobile & Tablette

La maltodextrine augmente la force

Actualités sport, fitness & musculation, vidéos des pros, études scientifiques. Discutez avec la communauté Nutrimuscle et partagez votre expérience...

Modérateurs: Nutrimuscle-Conseils, Nutrimuscle-Diététique

La maltodextrine augmente la force

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 7 Jan 2010 23:56

The Ergogenic Effects Of Carbohydrate Supplementation On Force Output And Slope Of Fatigue During A Selected Resistance Protocol.
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research. 24 Supplement 1:1, January 2010.
Wax, Ben; Kinzey, Steve; Lyons, Brian; Brown, Stan

The ergogenic effects of carbohydrate ingestion prior to and during resistance training has yielded mixed results over the years. A number of investigations have attempted to determine the ergogenic effects of carbohydrate supplementations utilizing squats or some type of circuit style of resistance training. Past These investigations measured performance in terms of a specific number of repetitions successfully performed, which failed to account for central fatigue factors related to the specific exercise chosen. Few investigations have measured the relationship between carbohydrate supplementation ingestion and force output during periods of voluntary and stimulated contractions. To determine the ergogenic effects of carbohydrate ingestion supplementation on force output during a selected resistance protocol. 6 male subjects with a minimum of 3 years of bodybuilding and/or power lifting backgrounds training performed one mock trial and two randomly assigned exercise trials one week apart, in which the experimental treatment, glucose polymer (GP) and placebo (P), were randomly assigned and administered in a double blind fashion. The subjects were seated with the knee at an angle slightly less than 900 by a horizontal strap securely anchored just above the malleoli and attached at the other end to the a strain gauge. Subjects were strapped at the waist to maintain muscle length and prevent substantial use of hip extensors. The subjects ingested either a 10% GP solution (0.1g[middle dot]kg-1[middle dot]body mass-1) or P 5 minutes before performing a maximal voluntary contraction with their perceived dominant leg to determine force output. Following another 5 minute rest and thereafter at 6 minute intervals a GP (0.17g[middle dot]kg-1[middle dot]body mass-1) or P solution was ingested during the protocol. The protocol consisted of one leg isometric contractions at 50% of their previously determined one repetition maximum for 20 seconds, followed by 40 seconds of rest between contractions, until failure occurred. Failure was defined as the inability to sustain target force for 5 consecutive seconds. The decrease in force generating capacity was tested from brief maximal voluntary contractions (MVC's) and short bursts of 60 Hz stimulation applied at 5 minute intervals. Force was measured using a Transducer Techniques 300 pound strain gauge type load cell, which sent a signal to an amplifier through a fixed wire. Once the signal was amplified it was transferred to a desktop computer for interpretation. Sampling was recorded at 1000 Hz. A paired sample T-test revealed performance measured in time to exhaustion (29 +/- 13.08 minutes for GP and 16 +/- 8.12 for P), total force production (492.92 +/- 192.42 kilograms for GP and 306.62 +/- 130.07 kilograms for P), and slope of fatigue (-.0594 +/- -.0299 for GP and -.0300 +/- -.0109 for P) were significantly different in the GP than Pbetween treatments (p < .05).

The results suggest GP ingestion prior to and during selected resistance protocols increase time to exhaustion, total force production and slope of fatigue in well trained lifters. In conclusion, the ingestion of a liquid carbohydrate supplement prior to and intermittently during selected resistance protocols appears to provide an ergogenic effect that is reflected by increased force production and delayed time to fatigue.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 38831
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Messagepar maximass » 8 Jan 2010 10:00

Je ne suis pas un génie en anglais comme je l'ai dit mais ils évoquent ces résultats avec la prise de glucides mais pas précisément de maltodextrine?
Si c'est le cas et que j'ai mal compris, les mêmes résultats peuvent être espèrer avec du dextrose, du waxy ou du ***** par exemple?
Avatar de l’utilisateur
maximass
 
Messages: 203
Inscription: 25 Mai 2009 10:33

Messagepar Plasma » 8 Jan 2010 10:16

Ils parlent d'un polymère de glucose. Donc ça élimine le dextrose (dans le cadre de l'étude mais ça ne veut pas dire que ça ne marcherait pas avec du dextrose). Le waxy et le *****, en revanche, sont bien des polymères de glucose.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Plasma
 
Messages: 360
Inscription: 22 Déc 2008 11:46

Messagepar maximass » 8 Jan 2010 10:39

Plasma a écrit:Ils parlent d'un polymère de glucose. Donc ça élimine le dextrose (dans le cadre de l'étude mais ça ne veut pas dire que ça ne marcherait pas avec du dextrose). Le waxy et le *****, en revanche, sont bien des polymères de glucose.

ok merci de l'éclaircissement. :D
Avatar de l’utilisateur
maximass
 
Messages: 203
Inscription: 25 Mai 2009 10:33

Re: La maltodextrine augmente la force

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 27 Déc 2016 21:02

The Ergogenic Effects Of Carbohydrate Supplementation On Force Output And Slope Of Fatigue During A Selected Resistance Protocol.
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research. 24 Supplement 1:1, January 2010.
Wax, Ben; Kinzey, Steve; Lyons, Brian; Brown, Stan

The ergogenic effects of carbohydrate ingestion prior to and during resistance training has yielded mixed results over the years. A number of investigations have attempted to determine the ergogenic effects of carbohydrate supplementations utilizing squats or some type of circuit style of resistance training. Past These investigations measured performance in terms of a specific number of repetitions successfully performed, which failed to account for central fatigue factors related to the specific exercise chosen. Few investigations have measured the relationship between carbohydrate supplementation ingestion and force output during periods of voluntary and stimulated contractions. To determine the ergogenic effects of carbohydrate ingestion supplementation on force output during a selected resistance protocol. 6 male subjects with a minimum of 3 years of bodybuilding and/or power lifting backgrounds training performed one mock trial and two randomly assigned exercise trials one week apart, in which the experimental treatment, glucose polymer (GP) and placebo (P), were randomly assigned and administered in a double blind fashion. The subjects were seated with the knee at an angle slightly less than 900 by a horizontal strap securely anchored just above the malleoli and attached at the other end to the a strain gauge. Subjects were strapped at the waist to maintain muscle length and prevent substantial use of hip extensors. The subjects ingested either a 10% GP solution (0.1g[middle dot]kg-1[middle dot]body mass-1) or P 5 minutes before performing a maximal voluntary contraction with their perceived dominant leg to determine force output. Following another 5 minute rest and thereafter at 6 minute intervals a GP (0.17g[middle dot]kg-1[middle dot]body mass-1) or P solution was ingested during the protocol. The protocol consisted of one leg isometric contractions at 50% of their previously determined one repetition maximum for 20 seconds, followed by 40 seconds of rest between contractions, until failure occurred. Failure was defined as the inability to sustain target force for 5 consecutive seconds. The decrease in force generating capacity was tested from brief maximal voluntary contractions (MVC's) and short bursts of 60 Hz stimulation applied at 5 minute intervals. Force was measured using a Transducer Techniques 300 pound strain gauge type load cell, which sent a signal to an amplifier through a fixed wire. Once the signal was amplified it was transferred to a desktop computer for interpretation. Sampling was recorded at 1000 Hz. A paired sample T-test revealed performance measured in time to exhaustion (29 +/- 13.08 minutes for GP and 16 +/- 8.12 for P), total force production (492.92 +/- 192.42 kilograms for GP and 306.62 +/- 130.07 kilograms for P), and slope of fatigue (-.0594 +/- -.0299 for GP and -.0300 +/- -.0109 for P) were significantly different in the GP than Pbetween treatments (p < .05).

The results suggest GP ingestion prior to and during selected resistance protocols increase time to exhaustion, total force production and slope of fatigue in well trained lifters. In conclusion, the ingestion of a liquid carbohydrate supplement prior to and intermittently during selected resistance protocols appears to provide an ergogenic effect that is reflected by increased force production and delayed time to fatigue.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 38831
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: La maltodextrine augmente la force

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 28 Déc 2016 18:47

Traduction de l’étude :wink:

Les effets ergogéniques de la supplémentation en glucides sur la force et la fatigue au cours d'un protocole de résistance.
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research. 24 Supplément 1: 1, janvier 2010.
Cire, Ben; Kinzey, Steve; Lyons, Brian; Brown, Stan

Les effets ergogéniques de l'ingestion de glucides avant et pendant la formation de résistance a donné des résultats mitigés au cours des années. Un certain nombre d'enquêtes ont tenté de déterminer les effets ergogéniques des suppléments d'hydrates de carbone en utilisant squats ou un certain type de style de circuit d'entraînement de résistance. Ces enquêtes ont mesuré la performance en fonction d'un nombre précis de répétitions effectuées avec succès, ce qui ne tient pas compte des facteurs de fatigue centraux liés à l'exercice spécifique. Peu d'études ont mesuré la relation entre l'ingestion de suppléments de glucides et la production de la force pendant les périodes de contractions volontaires et stimulées. Déterminer les effets ergogéniques de la supplémentation en ingestion d'hydrates de carbone sur la force pendant un protocole de résistance . 6 sujets de sexe masculin ayant au moins 3 ans de musculation ont effectué une épreuve simulée et deux essais d'épreuves aléatoires à une semaine d'intervalle, dans lesquels le traitement expérimental, le polymère de glucose (GP) et le placebo (P) répartis au hasard et administrés en double aveugle. Les sujets étaient assis avec le genou à un certain angle par une sangle horizontale solidement ancrée juste au-dessus des malléoles et attachée à l'autre extrémité à la jauge de contrainte. Les sujets ont été attachés à la taille pour maintenir la longueur du muscle et empêcher une utilisation substantielle des extenseurs de la hanche. Les sujets ont ingéré soit une solution GP à 10% (0,1 g de masse corporelle-1) soit P 5 minutes avant d'effectuer une contraction volontaire maximale avec leur jambe dominante perçue pour déterminer la force. Après un autre repos de 5 minutes et par la suite à des intervalles de 6 minutes, on a ingéré une GP (0,17g [point milieu] kg-1 [point milieu] masse-1) ou une solution de P pendant le protocole. Le protocole consistait en une jambe de contractions isométriques à 50% de leur précédemment déterminé une répétition maximale pendant 20 secondes, suivie par 40 secondes de repos entre les contractions, jusqu'à ce que l'échec a eu lieu. L'échec a été défini comme l'incapacité à maintenir la force cible pendant 5 secondes consécutives. La diminution de la capacité de force a été testée à partir de contractions volontaires maximales brèves (MVC) et de courtes impulsions de 60 Hz de stimulation appliquées à des intervalles de 5 minutes. La force a été mesurée à l'aide d'une cellule de charge du type Transducer Techniques de 300 livres, qui a envoyé un signal à un amplificateur à travers un fil fixe. Une fois le signal amplifié, il a été transféré à un ordinateur de bureau pour interprétation. L'échantillonnage a été enregistré à 1000 Hz. Un test T échantillonné apparié a révélé une performance mesurée en temps d'épuisement (29 +/- 13,08 minutes pour GP et 16 +/- 8,12 pour P), la production de force totale (492,92 +/- 192,42 kilogrammes pour GP et 306,62 +/- 130,07 Kilogrammes pour P), et la pente de fatigue (-0,094 +/- 2,099 pour GP et -0,0300 +/- -0,0109 pour P) étaient significativement différentes dans le GP que chez les traitements Pbentre (p <0,05).

Les résultats suggèrent que l'ingestion de GP avant et pendant des protocoles de résistance sélectionnés augmente le temps d'épuisement, la production de force totale et la pente de fatigue chez des élévateurs bien entraînés. En conclusion, l'ingestion d'un supplément de glucides liquides avant et de manière intermittente au cours de protocoles de résistance sélectionnés semble fournir un effet ergogène qui se traduit par une augmentation de la production de force et un retard de la fatigue
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 3836
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus


Retourner vers Actualités, vidéos, études scientifiques

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: Aucun utilisateur enregistré et 3 invités