Nutrimuscle Forum : Mobile & Tablette

La vitamine D protége le cerveau

Actualités sport, fitness & musculation, vidéos des pros, études scientifiques. Discutez avec la communauté Nutrimuscle et partagez votre expérience...

Modérateurs: Nutrimuscle-Conseils, Nutrimuscle-Diététique

La vitamine D protége le cerveau

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 20 Avr 2013 08:05

Low vitamin D concentration exacerbates adult brain dysfunction
Xiaoying Cui Am J Clin Nutr May 2013 vol. 97 no. 5 907-908

The links between vitamin D and brain function have strengthened considerably in the past decade (1). The empirical evidence includes the following: 1) convincing data from in vitro and animal experimental studies, 2) inconsistent findings from observational and analytic epidemiology, and 3) inconsistent findings from the handful of randomized controlled studies done in the field. Occasionally, the evidence from these different research domains converges. In this issue of the Journal, Suzuki et al (2) report the outcomes of a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vitamin D supplementation (1200 IU/d, for 1 y) on various Parkinson disease (PD)–related outcomes. Although the sample size was modest (n = 114), there were clear group differences in several of the outcomes. In addition, there were tantalizing findings showing that vitamin D supplementation interacted with common polymorphisms in the gene coding for the vitamin D receptor (VDR) to prevent decline. The findings are informative: those who received placebo (and thus those who were more likely to have persisting 25-hydroxyvitamin D insufficiency or deficiency) had a steady worsening on PD outcomes. In contrast, those who received vitamin D supplements had no change in PD outcomes over the year. The results strongly suggest that low vitamin D status exacerbates disease progression.

The active form of vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) operates via the VDR, the smallest member of the family of nuclear receptors (which includes other brain-critical signaling pathways such as retinoic acid, thyroid hormone, sex hormones, etc). The brain distributions of the VDR, and the key enzyme required for the conversion of the prohormone (25-hydroxyvitamin D) to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, have been mapped (3). Of particular relevance to the target article, VDR was most strongly expressed in dopamine-rich areas such as the substantia nigra. We have recently confirmed that all large tyrosine hydroxylase–positive (dopaminergic) neurons in the human substantia nigra also express VDR (4). In addition, there is in vitro evidence that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D increases the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (5).

The timing of vitamin D deficiency produces variable effects on the brain. There is a growing body of convergent evidence linking low prenatal vitamin D to an increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia (6). It is thought that the mechanisms linking developmental vitamin D deficiency with neurodevelopmental disorders probably relates to the well-described pro-differentiation, antiproliferative properties of the active form of vitamin D (and of steroids in general). Thus, the absence of vitamin D deprives the developing brain of an expected signal.

The links between vitamin D deficiency and adult brain function suggest that other mechanisms may be involved. Animal experiments that have examined the impact of transient vitamin D deficiency on adult brain outcomes suggest relatively modest neurochemical and behavioral phenotypes (7). However, there is convergent evidence that vitamin D may have “neuroprotective” properties (8). For example, vitamin D has a direct neuroprotective action against excitotoxic insults by downregulating l-type calcium channels (9), and pretreatment with vitamin D attenuates the effects of various stressors of interest in PD disease, including 6-hydroxydopamine–induced neurotoxicity (10). An experimental study based on a rodent ischemic stroke model reported that animals allocated to a vitamin D–deficient diet (before the stroke lesion) subsequently had significantly greater ischemic brain damage and worse functional impairments (compared with rodents fed vitamin D–replete chow) (11). Overall, these findings suggest that low vitamin D affects adult brain function in subtle ways but may exacerbate “second hit” stressors. This hypothesis is entirely consistent with the findings from Suzuki et al (2). Vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency exacerbated the progression of an underlying brain disorder (the PD-related outcomes worsened in the placebo arm). In contrast, those who received the vitamin D supplement had no disease progression over the year of the study (but still required ongoing l-dopa treatment).

From a neuroscience perspective, there is a growing body of evidence showing that developmental vitamin D deficiency alters brain development—it may be a “sufficient cause” with respect to neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia. In contrast, adult vitamin D deficiency leaves the brain more vulnerable to second hits and/or exacerbates the progression of concurrent brain disorders—but as a cause, it is neither necessary nor sufficient. Regardless, because vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in the community, and may exacerbate a range of adverse brain outcomes (eg, PD and stroke), optimizing vitamin D status could translate to important gains from a public health perspective. The consequences of persistent vitamin D deficiency on adult brain outcomes may be delayed (ie, have a long latency) and interact with a range of other exposures and risk factors. We speculate that adult vitamin D deficiency could exacerbate the progression of a wide range of other brain disorders such as multiple sclerosis, dementia, and depression.

If the findings of Suzuki et al (2) are replicated, and if future studies confirm that the treatment of vitamin D deficiency is not associated with unintended adverse outcomes, then there is a case to translate this treatment promptly. Even if optimal vitamin D status delays PD progression by a small degree, this treatment is cheap, simple to access (eg, across the counter), relatively safe, and publicly acceptable.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 38849
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 20 Avr 2013 08:16

Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vitamin D supplementation in Parkinson disease
Masahiko Suzuki Am J Clin Nutr May 2013 vol. 97 no. 5 1004-1013

Background: In our previous study, higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) FokI CC genotype were associated with milder Parkinson disease (PD).

Objective: We evaluated whether vitamin D3 supplementation inhibits the progression of PD on the basis of patient VDR subgroups.

Design: Patients with PD (n = 114) were randomly assigned to receive vitamin D3 supplements (n = 56; 1200 IU/d) or a placebo (n = 58) for 12 mo in a double-blind setting. Outcomes were clinical changes from baseline and the percentage of patients who showed no worsening of the modified Hoehn and Yahr (HY) stage and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS).

Results: Compared with the placebo, vitamin D3 significantly prevented the deterioration of the HY stage in patients [difference between groups: P = 0.005; mean ± SD change within vitamin D3 group: +0.02 ± 0.62 (P = 0.79); change within placebo group: +0.33 ± 0.70 (P = 0.0006)]. Interaction analyses showed that VDR FokI genotypes modified the effect of vitamin D3 on changes in the HY stage (P-interaction = 0.045), UPDRS total (P-interaction = 0.039), and UPDRS part II (P-interaction = 0.021). Compared with the placebo, vitamin D3 significantly prevented deterioration of the HY stage in patients with FokI TT [difference between groups: P = 0.009; change within vitamin D3 group: −0.38 ± 0.48 (P = 0.91); change within placebo group, +0.63 ± 0.77 (P = 0.009)] and FokI CT [difference between groups: P = 0.020; change within vitamin D3 group: ±0.00 ± 0.60 (P = 0.78); change within placebo group: +0.37 ± 0.74 (P = 0.014)] but not FokI CC. Similar trends were observed in UPDRS total and part II.

Conclusion: Vitamin D3 supplementation may stabilize PD for a short period in patients with FokI TT or CT genotypes without triggering hypercalcemia, although this effect may be nonspecific for PD.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 38849
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 22 Avr 2013 11:17

Traduction de l'étude : :wink:
Une faible concentration en vitamine D augmente le dysfonctionnement du cerveau adulte.

Les liens entre la vitamine D et la fonction cérébrale se sont considérablement renforcés dans la dernière décennie (1). La preuve empirique comprend les éléments suivants : 1) les données convaincantes in vitro et des études expérimentales chez les animaux. 2) des conclusions contradictoires de l’épidémiologie d’observation et d’analyse, et 3) les conclusions incompatibles de plusieurs études randomisées et contrôlées, réalisées sur le terrain. De temps en temps, les preuves de ces différents domaines convergent. Dans un numéro d'un journal, la parution du rapport des résultats d’un essai en double aveugle de Suzuki et al (2), contrôlée par un placebo, de la supplémentation en vitamine D (1200 UI / j pendant 1 an) sur les différentes maladie de Parkinson (PD). Bien que la taille de l’échantillon était modeste (n=114), il n’y avait pas de différences claires entre les groupes. En outre, il y avait des résultats intéressants montrant qu’une supplémentation en vitamine D agit avec un polymorphisme commun dans le gène codant le récepteur de la vitamine D (VDR) pour empêcher la baisse du taux de celle-ci. Les résultats sont instructifs : ceux ayant reçu le placebo (et donc ceux qui étaient plus susceptibles d’avoir une insuffisance ou une carence en 25-hydroxyvitamine D) ont eu une dégradation constance des résultats de la maladie de Parkinson. En revanche, ceux qui ont reçu des suppléments en vitamine D, n’avait pas de changement dans les résultats sur la maladie de Parkinson au cours de l’année. Les résultats suggèrent fortement qu’un faible statut en vitamine D augmente la progression de la maladie.

La forme active de la vitamine D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamine D) fonctionne via le VDR (récepteur de la vitamine D), le plus petit membre de la famille des récepteurs nucléaires (qui comprend d’autres voies de signalisation du cerveau tels que l’acide rétinoïque, l’hormone de la thyroïde, les hormones sexuelles, etc). Les distributions du VDR par le cerveau, et l’enzyme clé nécessaire à la conversion de la prohormone (25-hydroxyvitamine D) de 1,25-dihydroxyvitamine D, ont été cartographiés (3). Une importance particulière à la zone cible a été effectuée, le VDR a été plus fortement exprimé dans les zones riches en dopamine comme la substantia nigra. Nous avons récemment confirmé que tous les grands neurones, la tyrosine hydroxylase (dopaminergique) dans la substantia nigra chez l’homme, sécrete également le VDR. En outre, il est évident, in vitro, que la 1,25-dihydroxyvitamine D, augmente l’action de la tyrosine hydroxylase (5).
Le temps de la carence en vitamine D produit des effets variables sur le cerveau. Il y a un nombre croissant de preuves convergentes reliant un taux prénatal bas en vitamine D à un risque accru de troubles neurologiques comme la schizophrénie (6). On pense que les mécanismes qui lient le développement de la carence en vitamine D et les troubles neurologiques, ont probablement un lien avec les pro-différenciation, des propriétés anti-prolifératives bien décrits de la forme active de la vitamine D ( et de stéroïdes en général). Ainsi, l’absence de vitamine D prive le cerveau en développement du signal attendu.

Les liens entre la carence en vitamine D et le fonctionnement du cerveau adulte suggèrent que d’autres mécanismes peuvent être impliqués. Les expérimentations animales qui ont examiné l’impact de la carence en vitamine D transitoire sur les résultats du cerveau adulte suggèrent que les phénotyes neurochimiques et comportementaux sont relativement peu significatifs (7). Cependant, il y a des preuves convergentes que la vitamine D pourrait avoir des propriétés neuroprotectrices (Par exemple, la vitamine D a une action neuroprotectrice directe contre les aggressions excitotoxiques, par une régulation négative des canaux calciques de type L (9), et le prétraitement avec la vitamine D atténue les effets de divers facteurs de stress qui interviennent dans la maladie PD, y compris la neurotoxicité induite par la 6-hydroxy. Une étude expérimentale basée sur un modèle d’AVC ischémique des rongeurs a rapporté que les animaux affectés à une alimentation en vitamine D déficiente ont considérablement plus de lésions cérébrales ischémiques et de déficiences fonctionnelles graves (en comparaison avec les rongeurs recevant un taux correct de vitamine D) (11). Globalement, ces résultats suggèrent que les faibles taux de vitamine D affectent le fonctionnement du cerveau adulte de façon discrète, mais augmente les facteurs de stress. Cette hypothèse est entièrement compatible avec les résultats de Suzuki et al (2). L’insuffisance ou une carence en vitamine D augmentent la progression d’un trouble cérébral sous-jacent (les résultats de PD, ont augmentés dans le groupe placebo). En revanche, ceux qui ont reçu un supplément en vitamine D, n’ont eu aucune progression de la maladie au cours de l’année de l’étude (mais le traitement en dopamine est toujours nécessaire).

Du point de vue des neurosciences, il y a un nombre croissant de preuves montrant que le développement de la carence en vitamine D altère le développement du cerveau, il peut être « une cause suffisante » en ce qui concerne les troubles neurodéveloppementaux tels que la schizophrénie. En revanche, les adultes carencés en vitamine D laisse leurs cerveaux plus vulnérables à la progression aux deuxième facteur, ou provoque l’augmentation dans le cerveau de troubles concomitants , mais comme cause unique , cette carence n’est pas suffisante. Peu importe, parce que la carence en vitamine D est très répandue dans la population, et peut augmenter une série de résultats indésirables dans le cerveau (Par exemple, les maladies de Parkinson et les accidents vasculaires cérébraux), le statut en vitamine D optimal, pourrait se traduire par un bénéfice important dans la santé publique. Les conséquences de la carence en vitamine D persistant les résultats du cerveau adulte peuvent être retardés (c’est à dire, une longue période de latence) et d’interagir avec une série d’autres expositions et de facteurs de risques. Nous pensons que la carence en vitamine D des adultes pourrait augmenter la progression d’un large éventail d’autres troubles du cerveau telles que la sclérose en plaques, la démence et la dépression.

Si les résultats de Suzuki et al (2) sont reproduits, et si de futures études confirment que le traitement de la carence en vitamine D n’est pas associé à des résultats négatifs imprévus, alors il s’agit d’une cause à interpréter rapidemment. Même si un statut en vitamine D optimal retarde la progression de PD , ce traitement n’est pas cher et simple d’accès, relativement sûr et acceptable par le public.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 3836
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 22 Avr 2013 11:57

Résultats d’un essai randomisé, en double aveugle, contrôlée par placebo de la supplémentation en vitamine D dans la maladie de Parkinson.
Contexte : dans l’étude précédente, la concentration élevée de 25-hydroxyvitamine D [25 (OH) D] et du récepteur de la vitamine D (VDR) fokl génotype CC, ont été associés à une maladie de parkinson pas très sévère.

Objectif : nous avons évalué si la supplémentation en vitamine D3 diminue la progression de la maladie de Parkinson sur la base de sous-groupes de patients en contrôlant le VDR.
Conception : les patients atteints de MP (n=114) ont été répartis au hasard pour recevoir des suppléments en vitamine D3 (n = 56; 1200 UI / j) ou un placebo (n=58 pour 12 mois, en double aveugle). Les résultats ont été les changements cliniques de bases, le pourcentage de patients qui ont montré l’absence d’aggravation de la Hoehn modifié et Yahr (HY), le stade de la maladie, et l’échelle d’évaluation unifié de Parkinson (UPDRS).

Résultats : en comparaison avec le placebo, la vitamine D3 a empêché de manière significative la détérioration de HY chez les patients [différence entre les groupes: P = 0,005; moyenne ± SD changement au sein du groupe vitamine D3: +0,02 ± 0,62 (P = 0,79); tandis que les changements au sein du groupe placebo étaient de 0,33 ± 0,70 (P = 0,0006)]. Les analyses d’interactions ont montré que le VDR Fokl génotypes est modifié par l’effet de la vitamine D3 sur l’évolution de HY (P-interaction = 0,045), au total UPDRS (P-interaction = 0,039), et la partie II UPDRS (P-interaction = 0,021). En comparaison avec le placebo, la vitamine D3 a empêché de manière significative la phase HY chez des patients atteints de Fokl TT [différence entre les groupes: P = 0,009; changement au sein de la vitamine D3 groupe: -0.38 ± 0,48 (P = 0,91), le changement au sein du groupe placebo + 0,63 ± 0,77 (P = 0,009)] et FokI CT [différence entre les groupes: P = 0,020; changement au sein du groupe vitamine D3: ± 0,00 ± 0,60 (P = 0.78, les changements au sein du groupe placebo: 0,37 ± 0,74 (P = 0,014 )] mais pas FokI CC. Des tendances similaires ont été observées dans UPDRS total et de la partie II.

Conclusions : la supplémentation en vitamine D3 peut stabiliser la maladie de parkinson pour les patients atteint de FokI TT ou génotypes CT sans déclencher une hypercalcémie, bien que cet effet puisse être non spécifique pour PD.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 3836
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus


Retourner vers Actualités, vidéos, études scientifiques

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: Bing [Bot] et 9 invités