Nutrimuscle Forum : Mobile & Tablette

Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Actualités sport, fitness & musculation, vidéos des pros, études scientifiques. Discutez avec la communauté Nutrimuscle et partagez votre expérience...

Modérateurs: Nutrimuscle-Conseils, Nutrimuscle-Diététique

Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 20 Sep 2020 11:52

The COVID-19 pandemic: is there a role for magnesium? Hypotheses and perspectives
Magnesium Research Volume 33, issue 2, April-May-June 2020 Stefano Iotti

In the last 20 years, three zoonotic epidemics – severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) in 2003, Middle East respiratory syndrome (Mers) in 2012, and, since December 2019, Covid-19 – were triggered by β-coronaviruses (CoV) and exacted a high toll in human lives [1-3]. Responsible for Covid-19 is SARS-CoV-2, which shares a high degree of homology with SarsCoV and MersCoV [4].

β-CoV belong to the large family of Coronaviridae, single-stranded RNA viruses. About 70% of their genome codes for replicases/transcriptases, which are crucial for viral replication, while the remaining 30% codes for structural proteins, i.e., spike (S), membrane (M), nucleocapside (N), and envelope (E) proteins. The S-proteins, responsible for the crown-like shape of the viruses, play a crucial role in pathogenesis of the diseases since they engage host proteins to infect the cells. While the S protein of MersCoV binds to human DiPeptidyl Peptidase 4 [5], the S proteins of SarsCoV and SARS-CoV-2 bind with similar affinity to the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)2 [3, 6], ubiquitously expressed and rather abundant in the lung, heart, kidney, and blood vessels [7]. The S proteins need to be primed by host proteases, among which transmembrane protease-serine (TMPRSS)2, to allow viral entry into the cells [8]. It is noteworthy that the S protein of SARS-CoV-2 has also a potential cleavage site for furin [9], a calcium-dependent serine endoprotease that is abundant in the lung (https://www.proteinatlas.org/ENSG000001 ... RIN/tissue). This furin binding site has been described in highly pathogenic viruses and might augment SARS-CoV-2's internalization.

After being inhaled, SARS-CoV-2 reaches the nose and the throat, where it infects the epithelial cells, which are rather rich in ACE2. In the initial stages of the infection, there are either no symptoms or mild clinical manifestations, such as dry cough, sore throat, mild fever, smell and taste dysfunction, and general malaise. If the immune system fails in controlling the infection in the early stages, the virus reaches the alveoli, lined by cells that express high levels of ACE2, and interstitial pneumonia develops. In about 5% of the patients, a fatal and fulminant hypercytokinaemia dramatically and rapidly deteriorates the clinical conditions with the onset of acute respiratory distress, thromboembolism, and multiple organ failure [10-12] (figure 1).

Accordingly, the anti-IL6 Tocilizumab and the IL1-receptor antagonist Anakinra have been approved to treat patients with COVID-19. As of May 2, COVID-19 is considered a respiratory infection with important systemic effects that importantly impact the immune and cardiovascular systems. An early and prognostic lymphopenia occurs in more than 80% of patients, with a more significant reduction of CD4+ than CD8+ [13-15].

In addition, endothelial cell involvement has been shown in various vascular beds in patients with COVID-19 [16]. SARS-CoV-2 can directly infect endothelial cells using the ACE2 receptor. Moreover, the cytokine storm triggered by the overwhelming inflammatory response to the virus impairs endothelial function, thus increasing permeability, inducing vasoconstriction, and fostering thrombogenesis [14]. These detrimental events in the lung microvasculature greatly imbalance the ventilation/perfusion ratio, rapidly leading to acute respiratory failure, while in other organs SARS-CoV-2-associated endothelial dysfunction causes ischemia and organ failure. Indeed, a recent paper in JAMA reports that “COVID-19 is a systemic disease that primarily injures the vascular endothelium” [17].

While learning about the clinical presentation and the pathophysiology of COVID-19, it became clear that some features of the disease recall the symptoms and signs that are described in magnesium (Mg) deficiency [18]. Therefore, it is feasible to hypothesize that Mg deficiency, rather common in western world because a large part of population does not consume adequate amounts of Mg [19], might contribute to the onset, progress, and severity of COVID-19. To our best knowledge, at the moment there are no data about Mg homeostasis in COVID-19, which is not surprising because magnesemia is not routinely evaluated in clinical practice. On the other hand, it should be stressed that the severe Mg deficiency with clinical symptoms nowadays is rare. Rather, there is the occurrence of a latent subclinical Mg deficiency that is difficult to detect by routine laboratory evaluation of Mg in serum. Here, we list some cues that might be useful for challenging discussions and future studies (figure 2):

individuals with comorbidities, i.e., hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and obesity, are more prone to develop severe COVID-19. These diseases are all characterized by hypomagnesemia which might be exacerbated by some pharmaceuticals (diuretics, proton-pump inhibitors), and the supplementation of Mg has beneficial effects [20]. Latent Mg deficiency is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Indeed, a meta-analysis and systematic reviews indicate that dietary Mg intake is significantly and inversely associated with serum C reactive protein (CRP) levels [21]. Accordingly, Mg supplementation reduces CRP levels in individuals with inflammation (CRP levels > 3 mg/dL) [22].

In a recent study, it has been shown that Mg supplementation attenuates disease severity and accelerates recovery in experimental murine colitis [23].Another hint comes from the evidence that COVID-19 is particularly severe and associated with high mortality in the elderly [24], known to be frequently Mg deficient because of malnourishment, comorbidities, and polypharmacy. Another puzzling issue to consider is the relation existing between Mg and stress. There is no doubt that the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has generated stress not only among health professionals but also in common people, because of confinement, fear, economic uncertainty. Stress hormones, i.e., catecholamines and corticosteroids, cause the shift of Mg from the intracellular to the extracellular space which may result in enhanced urinary excretion of Mg and consequent reduction of serum Mg, which, in turn, increases the release of catecholamines, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, and cortisol, thus creating a vicious circle of reduced resistance to stress and further Mg depletion [25, 26] ;

Mg plays a role in shaping innate and adaptive immune systems [18]. A low Mg status activates inflammation, by sensitizing sentinel cells to the noxious agent, priming phagocytes and participating to the orchestration of the vascular and cellular events that characterize the process [27]. In in vivo models, a drop of magnesemia results in the classical inflammatory response, characterized by hyperemia, edema and a significant increase of the plasma levels of IL-6 and acute phase proteins [27]. Interestingly, evidence has been provided that Mg concentration in acutely inflamed tissues is reduced through the activation of the IL-33/ST2 axis [28]. On these bases, we hypothesize that a subclinical Mg deficiency exacerbates virus-induced inflammation, which determines a fall of local Mg, thus fostering an uncontrolled release of high amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The final result is the onset of a cytokine storm that can be fatal. Turning our attention to adaptive immune system, it is notable that in vitro and in vivo the proliferation and the activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are greatly reduced in Mg-deficient conditions [29]. Even more interesting is the evidence that CD8+ and, to a lower extent, CD4+ T cells are significantly reduced in the lung of Mg-deficient mice after inhalation of influenza A virus, resulting in exacerbated morbidity [29]. CD8+ and CD4+ impairment reported in COVID-19 might be, in part, supported by a low Mg status;

Mg is important in maintaining endothelial function and, therefore, vascular integrity [30]. Mg deficiency induces a pro-inflammatory phenotype, which means increased release of chemokines and cytokines as well as increased thrombogenicity. In response to inflammatory stimuli, the endothelium releases ultra-large multimers of von Willebrand factor, which form high-strength bonds with the platelets, thus favoring their binding to the arterial wall [30]. In parallel, Mg deficiency promotes platelet aggregation and their release of beta thromboglobulin and thromboxanes [31]. In addition, low Mg also affects endothelial fibrinolytic activity by upregulating type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor and preventing plasmin formation [30]. All together, these findings underpin that systemic or local Mg deficiency predicts platelet-dependent thrombosis. At the present moment, it is not clear whether SARS-CoV-2 alters endothelial function by directly infecting them and/or through the inflammatory response [32]. However, it is clear that a subtle chronic Mg deficiency might create a favorable microenvironment for the virus to promote thromboembolism;

Mg also maintains proper lung function and reduces the risk of airway hyper-reactivity and wheezing [33]. This is a relevant issue in respiratory tract infections. In addition, Mg reduced the release of TGFβ1 thereby preventing the deposition of collagen and consequently lung fibrosis in vivo[34]. Fibrosis is a disabling outcome of interstitial lung diseases. In some patients who recovered from COVID-19, lung fibrosis may develop [35] and Mg might be beneficial.


If Mg status impacts the susceptibility and the response to SARS-CoV-2 as depicted above, it is legitimate to hypothesize that Mg intake might influence COVID-19 outbreak. This would represent the typical task for a large-scale epidemiological study employing meta-analysis approach, which, however, could be better performed when the COVID-19 global outbreak is almost halted and the data of global deaths and confirmed cases of infection are more accurate. Meanwhile, as a work hypothesis, we perform a sort of preliminary survey employing the current official data of COVID-19 outbreak and the available data present in the literature on Mg intake. A clever approach often employed to evaluate the Mg intake in the US population is to refer to the map of water hardness of USA [36], exploiting the general habit of the US people to drink tap water. This approach of using the water hardness figure to explore a possible link between Mg and some diseases has been used in several studies reported in the literature, in particular to correlate the level of Mg, which is higher in hard water, and the risk of cardiovascular diseases [37]. Based on this approach, we focused on Colorado as state reference since it has the peculiarity of being an isolated area having a low-average water hardness (and therefore indicating a lower Mg intake (90-180 ppm) within a large area with hard water States (> 180 ppm) [36]. Therefore, the ratio of the comparison of the COVID-19 outbreak is taking the State Colorado as a model, comparing its outbreak data with the seven surrounding states: Utah, New Mexico, Kansas, Oklahoma, Arizona, Wyoming, Nebraska. Outbreak data were taken from https://www.vox.com/2020/3/26/21193848/ ... s-by-state at two different dates and are reported in table 1. Many more deaths and confirmed cases of infected people were reported in Colorado than in all the surrounding states. These differences are even more evident if we consider the data of the number of “tests per million people” (last right column). Our analysis is only suggestive and has no claim of completeness, since we did not consider other relevant factors such as population mobility in the period considered and many other variables that could have influenced the outbreak. We need and look forward to a rigorous meta-analysis that, as discussed above, could be performed in the terminal phase of COVID-19 outbreak.

CONCLUSIONS
Mg is the forgotten cation. However, it is well documented that low Mg dietary intake, several pathologies or drugs that impair its homeostasis – among which the widely used proton pump inhibitors and thiazides – lead to an impairment of Mg homeostasis, which is associated with important health problems [20].

There are common cues in Mg deficiency and COVID-19 that suggest the relevance of measuring magnesemia in all the patients in the different stages of the disease and, in case of deficiency, of supplementing the cation. A correct level of Mg serum levels might also represent an effective and inexpensive preventive countermeasure against the virus. Last, Mg supplementation might reveal very useful in managing the stress triggered by the pandemic as well as the posttraumatic stress disorder that will plague COVID-19's survivors, health professionals, and common people who have to face important changes of their habits and life-style.

Needless to say, more basic, translational, and clinical research is required to underpin the potential relationships between Mg status and COVID-19.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 20 Sep 2020 11:53

Image
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 20 Sep 2020 16:30

Traduction de l’étude :wink:

La pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle? Hypothèses et perspectives
Magnesium Research Volume 33, numéro 2, avril-mai-juin 2020

Au cours des 20 dernières années, trois épidémies zoonotiques - syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère (Sars) en 2003, syndrome respiratoire du Moyen-Orient (Mers) en 2012 et, depuis décembre 2019, Covid-19 - ont été déclenchées par des β-coronavirus (CoV) et a exigé un lourd tribut en vies humaines [1-3]. Responsable de Covid-19 est SARS-CoV-2, qui partage un haut degré d'homologie avec SarsCoV et MersCoV [4].

Les β-CoV appartiennent à la grande famille des Coronaviridae, virus à ARN simple brin. Environ 70% de leur génome code pour les réplicases / transcriptases, qui sont cruciales pour la réplication virale, tandis que les 30% restants codent pour les protéines structurales, à savoir le pic (S), la membrane (M), la nucléocapside (N) et l'enveloppe (E ) protéines. Les protéines S, responsables de la forme en couronne des virus, jouent un rôle crucial dans la pathogenèse des maladies puisqu'elles engagent des protéines hôtes pour infecter les cellules. Alors que la protéine S de MersCoV se lie à la DiPeptidyl Peptidase 4 [5] humaine, les protéines S de SarsCoV et SARS-CoV-2 se lient avec une affinité similaire à l'enzyme de conversion de l'angiotensine (ACE) 2 [3, 6], exprimée de manière ubiquitaire et plutôt abondant dans les poumons, le cœur, les reins et les vaisseaux sanguins [7]. Les protéines S doivent être amorcées par des protéases hôtes, parmi lesquelles la protéase-sérine transmembranaire (TMPRSS) 2, pour permettre l'entrée virale dans les cellules [8]. Il est à noter que la protéine S du SRAS-CoV-2 a également un site de clivage potentiel pour la furine [9], une sérine endoprotéase dépendante du calcium qui est abondante dans le poumon (https://www.proteinatlas.org/ENSG000001. .. RIN / tissu). Ce site de liaison à la furine a été décrit dans des virus hautement pathogènes et pourrait augmenter l'internalisation du SARS-CoV-2.

Après avoir été inhalé, le SRAS-CoV-2 atteint le nez et la gorge, où il infecte les cellules épithéliales, qui sont plutôt riches en ACE2. Dans les premiers stades de l'infection, il n'y a pas de symptômes ou des manifestations cliniques bénignes, telles qu'une toux sèche, un mal de gorge, une légère fièvre, un dysfonctionnement de l'odorat et du goût et un malaise général. Si le système immunitaire ne parvient pas à contrôler l'infection dans les premiers stades, le virus atteint les alvéoles, bordées de cellules qui expriment des niveaux élevés d'ACE2, et une pneumonie interstitielle se développe. Chez environ 5% des patients, une hypercytokinémie mortelle et fulminante aggrave considérablement et rapidement les conditions cliniques avec l'apparition d'une détresse respiratoire aiguë, d'une thromboembolie et d'une défaillance multiviscérale [10-12] (figure 1).

En conséquence, le Tocilizumab anti-IL6 et l'antagoniste des récepteurs de l'IL1 Anakinra ont été approuvés pour traiter les patients atteints de COVID-19. Depuis le 2 mai, le COVID-19 est considéré comme une infection respiratoire avec des effets systémiques importants qui ont un impact important sur les systèmes immunitaire et cardiovasculaire. Une lymphopénie précoce et pronostique survient chez plus de 80% des patients, avec une réduction plus significative des CD4 + que des CD8 + [17)
En apprenant la présentation clinique et la physiopathologie du COVID-19, il est devenu clair que certaines caractéristiques de la maladie rappellent les symptômes et les signes décrits dans la carence en magnésium (Mg) [18]. Par conséquent, il est possible de faire l'hypothèse que la carence en Mg, plutôt courante dans le monde occidental parce qu'une grande partie de la population ne consomme pas des quantités adéquates de Mg [19], pourrait contribuer à l'apparition, à la progression et à la gravité du COVID-19. À notre connaissance, il n'existe actuellement aucune donnée sur l'homéostasie du Mg dans le COVID-19, ce qui n'est pas surprenant car la magnésémie n'est pas systématiquement évaluée en pratique clinique. D'autre part, il faut souligner que la carence sévère en Mg avec des symptômes cliniques de nos jours est rare. Au contraire, il y a l'occurrence d'une carence latente subclinique en Mg qui est difficile à détecter par une évaluation de routine en laboratoire du Mg dans le sérum. Ici, nous énumérons quelques indices qui pourraient être utiles pour des discussions stimulantes et des études futures (figure 2):

les personnes souffrant de comorbidités, c'est-à-dire hypertension, maladies cardiovasculaires, diabète et obésité, sont plus susceptibles de développer un COVID-19 sévère. Ces maladies sont toutes caractérisées par une hypomagnésémie qui pourrait être exacerbée par certains produits pharmaceutiques (diurétiques, inhibiteurs de la pompe à protons) et la supplémentation en Mg a des effets bénéfiques [20]. Une carence latente en Mg est associée à une inflammation chronique de bas grade. En effet, une méta-analyse et des revues systématiques indiquent que l'apport alimentaire en Mg est significativement et inversement associé aux taux sériques de protéine C réactive (CRP) [21]. En conséquence, la supplémentation en Mg réduit les taux de CRP chez les personnes souffrant d'inflammation (taux de CRP> 3 mg / dL) [22].

Dans une étude récente, il a été montré que la supplémentation en Mg atténue la gravité de la maladie et accélère la guérison dans la colite murine expérimentale [23]. Un autre indice vient de la preuve que le COVID-19 est particulièrement sévère et associé à une mortalité élevée chez les personnes âgées [24]. , connue pour être fréquemment carencée en Mg en raison de la malnutrition, des comorbidités et de la polypharmacie. Une autre question déroutante à considérer est la relation existant entre le Mg et le stress. Il ne fait aucun doute que la pandémie de SRAS-CoV-2 a généré du stress non seulement chez les professionnels de la santé mais aussi chez les gens ordinaires, en raison de l'enfermement, de la peur et de l'incertitude économique. Les hormones de stress, c'est-à-dire les catécholamines et les corticostéroïdes, provoquent le déplacement du Mg de l'espace intracellulaire vers l'espace extracellulaire, ce qui peut entraîner une augmentation de l'excrétion urinaire de Mg et une réduction conséquente de la Mg sérique, qui, à son tour, augmente la libération de catécholamines, hormone adrénocorticotrophique , et le cortisol, créant ainsi un cercle vicieux de résistance réduite au stress et d'épuisement supplémentaire en Mg [25, 26];

Mg joue un rôle dans la formation des systèmes immunitaires innés et adaptatifs [18]. Un statut Mg bas active l'inflammation, en sensibilisant les cellules sentinelles à l'agent nocif, en amorçant les phagocytes et en participant à l'orchestration des événements vasculaires et cellulaires qui caractérisent le processus [27]. Dans les modèles in vivo, une baisse de la magnésie entraîne la réponse inflammatoire classique, caractérisée par une hyperémie, un œdème et une augmentation significative des taux plasmatiques d'IL-6 et des protéines de la phase aiguë [27]. Fait intéressant, des preuves ont été fournies que la concentration de Mg dans les tissus fortement enflammés est réduite par l'activation de l'axe IL-33 / ST2 [28]. Sur ces bases, nous émettons l'hypothèse qu'une carence subclinique en Mg exacerbe l'inflammation induite par le virus, qui détermine une chute de Mg locale, favorisant ainsi une libération incontrôlée de grandes quantités de cytokines pro-inflammatoires. Le résultat final est l'apparition d'une tempête de cytokines qui peut être fatale. En portant notre attention sur le système immunitaire adaptatif, il est à noter qu'in vitro et in vivo, la prolifération et l'activation des lymphocytes T CD4 + et CD8 + sont fortement réduites dans les conditions de déficit en Mg [29]. Encore plus intéressant est la preuve que les CD8 + et, dans une moindre mesure, les lymphocytes T CD4 + sont significativement réduits dans le poumon des souris déficientes en Mg après l'inhalation du virus de la grippe A, ce qui entraîne une morbidité exacerbée [29]. La déficience en CD8 + et CD4 + signalée dans COVID-19 pourrait être, en partie, soutenue par un faible statut en Mg;
Le magnésium est important dans le maintien de la fonction endothéliale et, par conséquent, de l'intégrité vasculaire [30]. Une carence en Mg induit un phénotype pro-inflammatoire, ce qui signifie une libération accrue de chimiokines et de cytokines ainsi qu'une augmentation de la thrombogénicité. En réponse à des stimuli inflammatoires, l'endothélium libère des multimères ultra-larges de facteur de von Willebrand, qui forment des liaisons à haute résistance avec les plaquettes, favorisant ainsi leur liaison à la paroi artérielle [30]. En parallèle, une carence en Mg favorise l'agrégation plaquettaire et leur libération de bêta-thromboglobuline et de thromboxanes [31]. En outre, une faible teneur en Mg affecte également l'activité fibrinolytique endothéliale en régulant à la hausse l'inhibiteur de l'activateur du plasminogène de type 1 et en empêchant la formation de plasmine [30]. Dans l'ensemble, ces résultats confirment que la carence systémique ou locale en Mg prédit une thrombose plaquettaire dépendante. À l'heure actuelle, il n'est pas clair si le SRAS-CoV-2 altère la fonction endothéliale en les infectant directement et / ou par la réponse inflammatoire [32]. Cependant, il est clair qu'une carence en Mg chronique subtile pourrait créer un microenvironnement favorable pour que le virus favorise la thromboembolie;

Mg maintient également une fonction pulmonaire adéquate et réduit le risque d'hyperréactivité des voies respiratoires et de respiration sifflante [33]. Il s'agit d'un problème pertinent dans les infections des voies respiratoires. De plus, le Mg a réduit la libération de TGFβ1, empêchant ainsi le dépôt de collagène et par conséquent la fibrose pulmonaire in vivo [34]. La fibrose est une issue invalidante des maladies pulmonaires interstitielles. Chez certains patients qui se sont rétablis du COVID-19, une fibrose pulmonaire peut se développer [35] et le Mg pourrait être bénéfique.


Si le statut Mg affecte la sensibilité et la réponse au SRAS-CoV-2 comme décrit ci-dessus, il est légitime de faire l'hypothèse que l'apport en Mg pourrait influencer l'épidémie de COVID-19. Cela représenterait la tâche typique d'une étude épidémiologique à grande échelle utilisant une approche de méta-analyse, qui, cependant, pourrait être mieux réalisée lorsque l'épidémie mondiale de COVID-19 est presque arrêtée et que les données sur les décès et les cas confirmés d'infection dans le monde sont plus précis. Pendant ce temps, comme hypothèse de travail, nous effectuons une sorte d'enquête préliminaire utilisant les données officielles actuelles de l'épidémie de COVID-19 et les données disponibles présentes dans la littérature sur l'apport en Mg. Une approche intelligente souvent employée pour évaluer l'apport en Mg dans la population américaine est de se référer à la carte de la dureté de l'eau des États-Unis [36], en exploitant l'habitude générale des Américains de boire de l'eau du robinet. Cette approche consistant à utiliser le chiffre de dureté de l'eau pour explorer un lien possible entre le Mg et certaines maladies a été utilisée dans plusieurs études rapportées dans la littérature, en particulier pour corréler le niveau de Mg, qui est plus élevé dans l'eau dure, et le risque de maladies cardiovasculaires. maladies [37]. Sur la base de cette approche, nous nous sommes concentrés sur le Colorado comme état de référence car il a la particularité d'être une zone isolée ayant une dureté de l'eau moyenne faible (et donc indiquant un apport inférieur en Mg (90-180 ppm) dans une grande zone d'eau dure. États (> 180 ppm) [36]. Par conséquent, le ratio de comparaison de l'épidémie de COVID-19 prend l'État du Colorado comme modèle, comparant ses données d'épidémie avec les sept États voisins: Utah, Nouveau-Mexique, Kansas, Oklahoma , Arizona, Wyoming, Nebraska. Les données sur les épidémies proviennent de https://www.vox.com/2020/3/26/21193848/ ... s-by-state à deux dates différentes et sont rapportées dans le tableau 1. Beaucoup plus de décès et de cas confirmés de personnes infectées ont été signalés dans le Colorado que dans tous les États voisins. Ces différences sont encore plus évidentes si l'on considère les données du nombre de «tests par million de personnes» (dernière colonne de droite). Notre analyse est uniquement suggestif et n'a aucune prétention d'exhaustivité, puisque nous n'avons pas considéré d'autres fa facteurs tels que la mobilité de la population au cours de la période considérée et de nombreuses autres variables qui auraient pu influencer l'épidémie. Nous avons besoin et attendons avec impatience une méta-analyse rigoureuse qui, comme indiqué ci-dessus, pourrait être effectuée dans la phase terminale de l'épidémie de COVID-19.

CONCLUSIONS
Mg est le cation oublié. Cependant, il est bien documenté qu'un faible apport alimentaire en Mg, plusieurs pathologies ou médicaments qui altèrent son homéostasie - parmi lesquels les inhibiteurs de la pompe à protons et les thiazidiques largement utilisés - conduisent à une altération de l'homéostasie du Mg, qui est associée à d'importants problèmes de santé [20] .

Il existe des indices communs de carence en Mg et de COVID-19 qui suggèrent la pertinence de mesurer la magnésémie chez tous les patients aux différents stades de la maladie et, en cas de carence, de compléter le cation. Un niveau correct de concentrations sériques de Mg pourrait également représenter une contre-mesure préventive efficace et peu coûteuse contre le virus. Enfin, la supplémentation en Mg pourrait s'avérer très utile pour gérer le stress déclenché par la pandémie ainsi que le trouble de stress post-traumatique qui affectera les survivants du COVID-19, les professionnels de la santé et les gens ordinaires qui doivent faire face à des changements importants de leurs habitudes et de leur style de vie. .

Inutile de dire que des recherches plus fondamentales, translationnelles et cliniques sont nécessaires pour étayer les relations potentielles entre le statut Mg et COVID-19.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 12698
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 16 Nov 2020 14:06

SARS-CoV-2: Influence of phosphate and magnesium, moderated by vitamin D, on energy (ATP)-metabolism and on severity of COVID-19
Theo ATG van Kempen am j physiol endo. 2020

The use of vitamin D to reduce the severity of COVID-19 complications is receiving considerable attention, backed by encouraging data. Its purported mode of action is as an immune modulator. Vitamin D, however, also affects metabolism of phosphate and Mg, which may well play a critical role in SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis.

SARS-CoV-2 may induce a cytokine storm that drains ATP whose regeneration requires phosphate and Mg. These minerals, however, are often deficient in conditions that predispose people to severe COVID-19, including older age (especially males), diabetes, obesity, and usage of diuretics.

Symptoms observed in severe COVID-19 also fit well with those seen in classical hypophosphatemia and hypomagnesemia, such as thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, dysfunction of liver and kidneys, neurologic disturbances, immunodeficiency, failure of heart and lungs, delayed weaning from a respirator, cardiac arrhythmia, seizures, and finally multi-organ failure.

Deficiencies of phosphate and Mg can be amplified by kidney problems commonly observed in COVID-19 patients resulting in their wastage into urine. Available data show that phosphate and Mg are deficient in COVID-19 with phosphate showing a remarkable correlation with its severity. In one experiment, COVID-19 patients were supplemented with a cocktail of vitamin D3, Mg, and vitamin B12, with very encouraging results. We thus argue that COVID-19 patients should be monitored and treated for phosphate and Mg deficiencies, ideally already in the early phases of infection. Supplementation of phosphate and Mg combined with vitamin D could also be implemented as a preventative strategy in populations at risk.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 16 Nov 2020 14:11

A cohort study to evaluate the effect of combination [b]Vitamin D, Magnesium and Vitamin B12 (DMB) on progression to severe outcome in older COVID-19 patients.[/b]
Chuen Wen Tan, medRxiv 2020.

Objective: To determine the clinical outcomes of older COVID-19 patients who received DMB compared to those who did not. We hypothesized that fewer patients administered DMB would require oxygen therapy and/or intensive care support than those who did not.

Methodology: Cohort observational study of all consecutive hospitalized COVID-19 patients aged 50 and above in a tertiary academic hospital who received DMB compared to a recent cohort who did not. Patients were administered oral vitamin D3 1000 IU OD, magnesium 150mg OD and vitamin B12 500mcg OD (DMB) upon admission if they did not require oxygen therapy. Primary outcome was deterioration post-DMB administration leading to any form of oxygen therapy and/or intensive care support.

Results: Between 15 January and 15 April 2020, 43 consecutive COVID-19 patients aged ≥50 were identified. 17 patients received DMB and 26 patients did not. Baseline demographic characteristics between the two groups was significantly different in age. In univariate analysis, age and hypertension showed significant influence on outcome while DMB retained protective significance after adjusting for age or hypertension separately in multivariate analysis. Fewer DMB patients than controls required initiation of oxygen therapy during their hospitalization (17.6% vs 61.5%, P=0.006). DMB exposure was associated with odds ratios of 0.13 (95% CI: 0.03 − 0.59) and 0.20 (95% CI: 0.04 − 0.93) for oxygen therapy and/or intensive care support on univariate and multivariate analyses respectively.

Conclusions: DMB combination in older COVID-19 patients was associated with a significant reduction in proportion of patients with clinical deterioration requiring oxygen support and/or intensive care support. This study supports further larger randomized control trials to ascertain the full benefit of DMB in ameliorating COVID-19 severity.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 16 Nov 2020 14:14

Déficit en magnésium - cause négligée d'un faible statut en vitamine D?
BMC Medicine > Numéro 1/2013 Armin Zittermann

Tout comme le déficit en vitamine D, le déficit en magnésium est considéré comme un facteur de risque de maladie cardiovasculaire. Plusieurs étapes du métabolisme de la vitamine D, comme la liaison de la vitamine D à sa protéine de transport et la conversion de la vitamine D en forme hormonale de 1,25-dihydroxyvitamine D par hydroxylation hépatique et rénale, dépendent du magnésium comme cofacteur. Une nouvelle analyse de deux ensembles de données des enquêtes nationales sur la santé et la nutrition, publiée dans BMC Medicine, ont étudié les interactions potentielles entre l'apport en magnésium, la 25-hydroxyvitamine D en circulation, qui est l'indicateur généralement accepté du statut en vitamine D, et la mortalité. Les données indiquent un risque réduit de statut insuffisant / déficient en vitamine D à un apport élevé en magnésium et une association inverse entre la 25-hydroxyvitamine D circulante et la mortalité, en particulier la mortalité cardiovasculaire, chez les personnes dont l'apport en magnésium est supérieur à la médiane.

L'étude fournit des résultats importants concernant les interactions métaboliques potentielles entre le magnésium et la vitamine D et sa pertinence clinique. Cependant, les résultats doivent être considérés comme préliminaires car les données biochimiques sur le statut individuel en magnésium font défaut, la confusion ne peut être exclue et les questions sur la relation dose-réponse restent encore à répondre.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 16 Nov 2020 14:17

Magnesium, vitamin D status and mortality: results from US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001 to 2006 and NHANES III
Xinqing Deng, BMC Medicine volume 11, Article number: 187 (2013)

Background
Magnesium plays an essential role in the synthesis and metabolism of vitamin D and magnesium supplementation substantially reversed the resistance to vitamin D treatment in patients with magnesium-dependent vitamin-D-resistant rickets. We hypothesized that dietary magnesium alone, particularly its interaction with vitamin D intake, contributes to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels, and the associations between serum 25(OH)D and risk of mortality may be modified by magnesium intake level.

Methods
We tested these novel hypotheses utilizing data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001 to 2006, a population-based cross-sectional study, and the NHANES III cohort, a population-based cohort study. Serum 25(OH)D was used to define vitamin D status. Mortality outcomes in the NHANES III cohort were determined by using probabilistic linkage with the National Death Index (NDI).

Results
High intake of total, dietary or supplemental magnesium was independently associated with significantly reduced risks of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency respectively. Intake of magnesium significantly interacted with intake of vitamin D in relation to risk of both vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency. Additionally, the inverse association between total magnesium intake and vitamin D insufficiency primarily appeared among populations at high risk of vitamin D insufficiency. Furthermore, the associations of serum 25(OH)D with mortality, particularly due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colorectal cancer, were modified by magnesium intake, and the inverse associations were primarily present among those with magnesium intake above the median.

Conclusions
Our preliminary findings indicate it is possible that magnesium intake alone or its interaction with vitamin D intake may contribute to vitamin D status. The associations between serum 25(OH)D and risk of mortality may be modified by the intake level of magnesium. Future studies, including cohort studies and clinical trials, are necessary to confirm the findings.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 16 Nov 2020 17:55

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

Magnésium, statut en vitamine D et mortalité: résultats de l'enquête nationale américaine sur la santé et la nutrition (NHANES) 2001 à 2006 et NHANES III
Xinqing Deng, BMC Medicine volume 11, Numéro d'article: 187 (2013)

Contexte
Le magnésium joue un rôle essentiel dans la synthèse et le métabolisme de la vitamine D et la supplémentation en magnésium a considérablement inversé la résistance au traitement à la vitamine D chez les patients atteints de rachitisme résistant à la vitamine D dépendant du magnésium. Nous avons émis l'hypothèse que le magnésium alimentaire seul, en particulier son interaction avec l'apport en vitamine D, contribue aux taux sériques de 25-hydroxyvitamine D (25 (OH) D), et les associations entre le 25 (OH) D sérique et le risque de mortalité peuvent être modifiées par le magnésium. niveau d'admission.

Méthodes
Nous avons testé ces nouvelles hypothèses en utilisant les données de l'Enquête nationale sur la santé et la nutrition (NHANES) 2001 à 2006, une étude transversale basée sur la population, et la cohorte NHANES III, une étude de cohorte basée sur la population. Le sérum 25 (OH) D a été utilisé pour définir le statut en vitamine D. Les résultats de mortalité dans la cohorte NHANES III ont été déterminés en utilisant un lien probabiliste avec l'indice national de mortalité (NDI).

Résultats
Un apport élevé en magnésium total, alimentaire ou supplémentaire a été indépendamment associé à des risques significativement réduits de carence et d'insuffisance en vitamine D respectivement. L'apport en magnésium a interagi de manière significative avec l'apport en vitamine D en ce qui concerne le risque de carence et d'insuffisance en vitamine D. De plus, l'association inverse entre l'apport total en magnésium et l'insuffisance en vitamine D est apparue principalement parmi les populations à haut risque d'insuffisance en vitamine D. De plus, les associations du sérum 25 (OH) D avec la mortalité, en particulier due aux maladies cardiovasculaires (MCV) et au cancer colorectal, ont été modifiées par l'apport en magnésium, et les associations inverses étaient principalement présentes chez ceux dont l'apport en magnésium était supérieur à la médiane.

Conclusions
Nos résultats préliminaires indiquent qu'il est possible que l'apport en magnésium seul ou son interaction avec l'apport en vitamine D puisse contribuer au statut en vitamine D. Les associations entre le sérum 25 (OH) D et le risque de mortalité peuvent être modifiées par le niveau d'apport en magnésium. Des études futures, y compris des études de cohorte et des essais cliniques, sont nécessaires pour confirmer les résultats. :wink:
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 12698
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 24 Aoû 2022 10:16

Serum Calcium, Magnesium, and Phosphorus Levels in Patients with COVID-19: Relationships with Poor Outcome and Mortality
Juan J. Díez  Horm Metab Res 2022

In this retrospective study to assess the impact of serum corrected calcium (CorrCa), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P) levels, all adult patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 hospitalized during 2020 were included. Poor outcome was considered in patients who presented need for mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, or in-hospital mortality. We analyzed 2473 patients (956 females) aged (mean±SD) 63.4±15.9 years.

During admission, 169 patients (6.8%) required mechanical ventilation, 205 (8.3%) were admitted to the ICU, and 270 (10.9%) died. Composite variable of poor outcome, defined as need for mechanical ventilation, ICU admission or death, was present in 434 (17.5%) patients. In univariate analysis, the need for mechanical ventilation was positively related to Mg levels (OR 8.37, 95% CI 3.62–19.33; p<0.001); ICU admission was related to CorrCa (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25–0.99; p=0.049) and Mg levels (OR 5.81, 95% CI 2.74–12.35; p<0.001); and in-hospital mortality was related to CorrCa (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.14–2.64; p=0.011). The composite variable of poor outcome was only related to Mg (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.54–4.68; p=0.001). However, in multivariate analysis only CorrCa was significantly related to the need for mechanical ventilation (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.05–0.72; p=0.014) and ICU admission (OR 0.25; 95% CI 0.09–0.66; p=0.005), but not with in-hospital mortality or the composite variable.

In conclusion, CorrCa can be used as a simple and reliable marker of poor outcome in patients with COVID-19, although not to predict the risk of in-hospital mortality.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 25 Aoû 2022 16:04

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

Taux sériques de calcium, de magnésium et de phosphore chez les patients atteints de COVID-19 : relations avec de mauvais résultats et la mortalité
Juan J. Díez  Horm Metab Res 2022

Dans cette étude rétrospective visant à évaluer l'impact des taux sériques corrigés de calcium (CorrCa), de magnésium (Mg) et de phosphore (P), tous les patients adultes atteints de COVID-19 confirmé en laboratoire hospitalisés en 2020 ont été inclus. Un mauvais résultat a été pris en compte chez les patients qui présentaient un besoin de ventilation mécanique, une admission en unité de soins intensifs (USI) ou une mortalité hospitalière. Nous avons analysé 2473 patients (956 femmes) âgés (moyenne ± SD) de 63,4 ± 15,9 ans.

Lors de l'admission, 169 patients (6,8 %) ont nécessité une ventilation mécanique, 205 (8,3 %) ont été admis aux soins intensifs et 270 (10,9 %) sont décédés. La variable composite de mauvais résultat, définie comme le besoin de ventilation mécanique, l'admission en USI ou le décès, était présente chez 434 (17,5 %) patients. En analyse univariée, le besoin de ventilation mécanique était positivement lié aux niveaux de Mg (OR 8,37, IC à 95 % 3,62–19,33 ; p<0,001) ; L'admission en USI était liée à CorrCa (OR 0,49, IC à 95 % 0,25-0,99 ; p = 0,049) et aux niveaux de Mg (OR 5,81, IC à 95 % 2,74-12,35 ; p<0,001) ; et la mortalité hospitalière était liée à CorrCa (OR 1,73, IC à 95 % 1,14–2,64 ; p = 0,011). La variable composite de mauvais résultat n'était liée qu'au Mg (OR 2,68, IC à 95 % 1,54–4,68 ; p = 0,001). Cependant, dans l'analyse multivariée, seule CorrCa était significativement liée au besoin de ventilation mécanique (OR 0,19, IC à 95 % 0,05-0,72 ; p = 0,014) et à l'admission en USI (OR 0,25 ; IC à 95 % 0,09-0,66 ; p = 0,005), mais pas avec la mortalité hospitalière ou la variable composite.

En conclusion, CorrCa peut être utilisé comme un marqueur simple et fiable de mauvais résultats chez les patients atteints de COVID-19, mais pas pour prédire le risque de mortalité hospitalière.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 12698
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 25 Avr 2023 12:20

Admission Serum Magnesium Levels Is Associated with Short and Long-Term Clinical Outcomes in COVID-19 Patients
by Amitai Segev Nutrients 2023, 15(9), 2016;

Background: In the face of the global pandemic that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has created, readily available prognostic markers may be of great use. Objective: To evaluate the association between serum magnesium (sMg) levels on admission and clinical outcomes in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed all patients admitted to a single tertiary center with a primary de novo diagnosis of COVID-19. Patients were followed for a mean of 10 ± 7 months. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected and compared between five groups of patients according to sMg quintiles on hospital admission.

Results: The cohort included 1522 patients (58% male, 69 ± 17 years old). A low sMg level (1st quintile) was associated with higher rates of diabetes and steroid use, whereas a high sMg level (5th quintile) was associated with dyslipidemia, renal dysfunction, higher levels of inflammatory markers and stay in the intensive care unit. All-cause in-hospital and long-term mortality was higher in patients with both low and high sMg levels, compared with mid-range sMg levels (2nd, 3rd and 4th quintiles; 19% and 30% vs. 9.5%, 10.7% and 17.8% and 35% and 45.3% vs. 23%, 26.8% and 27.3% respectively; p < 0.001 for all). After adjusting for significant clinical parameters indicating severe disease and renal dysfunction, only low sMg state was independently associated with increased mortality (HR = 1.57, p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Both low and high sMg levels were associated with increased mortality in a large cohort of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. However, after correction for renal dysfunction and disease severity, only low sMg maintained its prognostic ability.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Pandémie COVID-19: le magnésium a-t-il un rôle?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 25 Avr 2023 17:27

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

Les niveaux de magnésium sérique à l'admission sont associés à des résultats cliniques à court et à long terme chez les patients atteints de COVID-19
par Amitai Segev Nutrients 2023, 15(9), 2016 ;

Contexte : Face à la pandémie mondiale que la maladie à coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) a créée, des marqueurs pronostiques facilement disponibles peuvent être d'une grande utilité. Objectif : Évaluer l'association entre les taux sériques de magnésium (sMg) à l'admission et les résultats cliniques chez les patients hospitalisés atteints de COVID-19. Méthodes : Nous avons analysé rétrospectivement tous les patients admis dans un seul centre tertiaire avec un diagnostic primaire de novo de COVID-19. Les patients ont été suivis pendant une moyenne de 10 ± 7 mois. Des données démographiques, cliniques et de laboratoire ont été recueillies et comparées entre cinq groupes de patients selon les quintiles sMg à l'admission à l'hôpital.

Résultats : La cohorte comprenait 1 522 patients (58 % d'hommes, 69 ± 17 ans). Un faible niveau de sMg (1er quintile) était associé à des taux plus élevés de diabète et d'utilisation de stéroïdes, tandis qu'un niveau élevé de sMg (5e quintile) était associé à une dyslipidémie, un dysfonctionnement rénal, des niveaux plus élevés de marqueurs inflammatoires et un séjour en unité de soins intensifs. La mortalité hospitalière et à long terme, toutes causes confondues, était plus élevée chez les patients présentant des taux de sMg faibles et élevés, par rapport aux taux de sMg moyens (2e, 3e et 4e quintiles ; 19 % et 30 % contre 9,5 %, 10,7 % et 17,8 % et 35 % et 45,3 % vs 23 %, 26,8 % et 27,3 % respectivement ; p < 0,001 pour tous). Après ajustement des paramètres cliniques significatifs indiquant une maladie grave et un dysfonctionnement rénal, seul un état de sMg bas était indépendamment associé à une mortalité accrue (HR = 1,57, p < 0,001).

Conclusions : Les niveaux de sMg faibles et élevés ont été associés à une mortalité accrue dans une grande cohorte de patients hospitalisés COVID-19. Cependant, après correction de la dysfonction rénale et de la gravité de la maladie, seul un faible sMg a maintenu sa capacité pronostique.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 12698
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus


Retourner vers Actualités, vidéos, études scientifiques

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: Aucun utilisateur enregistré et 3 invités