Nutrimuscle Forum : Mobile & Tablette

Vitamine D et virus?

Actualités sport, fitness & musculation, vidéos des pros, études scientifiques. Discutez avec la communauté Nutrimuscle et partagez votre expérience...

Modérateurs: Nutrimuscle-Conseils, Nutrimuscle-Diététique

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 25 Juin 2020 11:41

Vitamin D can prevent COVID-19 infection-induced multiple organ damage
Hatice Aygun Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology volume 393, pages1157–1160(2020)

Vitamin D is an immunomodulator hormone with an anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effect with a high safety profile. A lot of COVID-19 infected patients develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which may lead to multiple organ damage. These symptoms are associated with a cytokine storm syndrome. The aim of this letter is to note the 5 crucial points that vitamin D could have protective and therapeutic effects against COVID-19. For that reason, COVID-19 infection-induced multiple organ damage might be prevented by vitamin D.

To the Editor,

I am writing this letter with an aim to note that vitamin D could have protective and therapeutic effects against COVID-19.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) continues to spread very quickly and become fatal, since there is no effective treatment yet. For this reason, many countries resort to harsh quarantine precautions in order to curb the spread and prevent deaths.

It has been known that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is the main host cell receptor of COVID-19. ACE2 is expressed in type II alveolar cells of the lungs, absorptive enterocytes from the ileum and colon, esophagus upper and stratified epithelial, kidney proximal tubule cells, myocardial cells, bladder urothelial cells, and epithelial cells of the oral mucosa (Zou et al. 2020; Xu et al. 2020). The high expression of ACE2 could be a potential risk factor for infection routes of COVID-19. As a result of COVID-19 infection, many patients develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which may lead to multiple organ damage. These symptoms are associated with a cytokine storm syndrome, which might cause triggered T helper1 (Th1) cell responses. Many studies suggested that high concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF), interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α (MIP-1α), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and IFN-γ could be found in COVID-19 infected patients (Conti et al. 2020; Chen et al. 2020a; Liu et al. 2020; Huang et al. 2020).

Vitamin D has been known to play a critical role in the immune system. Vitamin D receptor has been expressed in multiple organs and tissues including the heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, nervous system, intestine, bone, parathyroid gland, cardiovascular system, and myocardium (Prufer et al. 1999). Vitamin D (Fig. 1) could prevent multiple organ damage caused by COVID in the following five ways:

1.
Vitamin D decreases the production of Th1 cells (Cantorna and Mahon 2005; Schleithoff et al. 2006; Ardizzone et al. 2009). Thus, it can suppress the progression of inflammation through reducing the generation of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, and IL-17 (Chastre and Fagon 2002; Society et al. 2005; Palmer et al. 2011). Vitamin D also decreases the generation of TNFα and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) (Peterson and Heffernan 2008; Talmor et al. 2008). Moreover, 1,25(OH)2D, biological active form of vitamin D, directly inhibits gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and IL-2 (Provvedini et al. 1983; Tsoukas et al. 1984). Vitamin D can reduce cytokine storm syndrome in patients with severe COVID-19 infection and thus prevent multiple organ damage.

2.
It was demonstrated that during viral infection, inactive vitamin D form can be converted to active form by the alveolar epithelial cells, and expression of the host defense gene cathelicidin increases (Hansdottir et al. 2008). Cathelicidins were shown to have a protective effect against lung damage due to hyperoxia (Jiang et al. 2020). Vitamin D could reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection by inducing the production of cathelicidin and defensins, which reduce the survival and replication of viruses.

3.
In human with primary and secondary kidney disease and in mice with diabetes, increased ACE2 expression was demonstrated (Ye et al. 2004; Lely et al. 2004). Vitamin D treatment was shown to inhibit ACE2 expression in the kidney (Ali et al. 2018). 1,25-(OH)2D3 exhibited renoprotective effect by decreasing ACE1 and ACE1/ACE2 ratio in streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropatic rats (Lin et al. 2016). In other words, vitamin D treatment can suppress ACE2 expression in kidney tubule cells, thereby preventing COVID-19 entry into the cell in diabetic patients and protecting the kidney.

4.
Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a natural peptide hormone in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. It is best known for increasing the blood pressure through stimulating aldosterone and its systemic vasoconstriction (Li et al. 2004). ACE2 directly catalyzes Ang II, thereby lowering its levels. COVID-19 infection may downregulate ACE2, which in turn could lead to excessive accumulation of Ang II. High levels of Ang II may cause ARDS, myocarditis, or cardiac injury (Hanff et al. 2020). Renin, on the other hand, is a proteolytic enzyme and a positive regulator of Ang II. Vitamin D is a potent inhibitor of renin (Li et al. 2004). A study reported that vitamin D receptor-lacking mice had elevated levels of renin and Ang II (Li et al. 2004). Indeed, vitamin D supplement was shown to prevent Ang II accumulation and to decrease proinflammatory activity of Ang II by suppressing the release of renin in patients infected with COVID, thus reducing the risk of ARDS, myocarditis, or cardiac injury (Hanff et al. 2020).

5.
Epidemiology studies reported that mortality and severity of COVID-19 virus infection are strongly correlated with older people and male. It is known that especially in children, the risk of developing COVID-19 infection is lower and symptoms are less severe. A recent study examined the relationship between ACE2 expression in the lungs, and age 3-month-old mice significantly increased ACE2 expression when compared with 24-month-old mice (Booeshaghi and Pachter 2020). It has been shown that ACE2 expression decreases dramatically in male and female rats, and this decrease is also higher in female rats compared with male rats (Xudong et al. 2006). ACE2 expression is generally higher in females than in males and tends to reduce with age (Chen et al. 2020b). Children have higher ACE expression than adults (Beneteau-Burnat et al. 1990). The high incidence of COVID-19 infection in the older people and men may be associated with low ACE2 expression.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARSCoV) and acid aspiration-induced ARDS mouse model-mediated ACE2 downregulation cause severity of the lung failure (Kuba et al. 2006). In human coronavirus-NL63, downregulation of the ACE2 protein was observed (Dijkman et al. 2012). Similarly, in COVID-19 infection, the virus binds to ACE2 receptors, following downregulation of ACE2 and cannot perform its physiological function. A decrease in ACE2 expression might be a greater risk of ARDS, acute lung inflammation, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, heart failure, cardiac fibrosis, and chronic kidney disease (Kuba et al. 2006; Sodhi et al. 2018; Tikellis and Thomas 2012).

Vitamin D deficiency is an important risk factor in ARDS as well as in many diseases. A single high-dose preoperative treatment with oral vitamin D was reported to prevent ARDS by reducing postoperative pulmonary vascular permeability index (Parekh et al. 2018). A study showed that vitamin D exhibits direct protective effect on alveolar epithelium, and decreased the death of the type 2 alveolar epithelial cells in lipopolysaccharide-induced ARDS mouse model; also, supplementation of vitamin D before the oesophagectomy prevents ARDS by reducing alveolar capillary damage, in clinical setting (Dancer et al. 2015). Another study demonstrated that vitamin D treatment was shown to have protective effect on the lungs by inhibiting renin, ACE, and Ang II level, and increased ACE2 level expression in acute lung injury model in animal (Xu et al. 2017). Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) may enhance the expression of ACE2 by pronouncedly impact on ACE2/Ang(1–7)/MasR pathway (Cui et al. 2019).

Thus, vitamin D deficiency may play a role in increasing the risk of developing COVID-19 infection. Recently, several studies supporting this hypothesis have been published. A study reported that northern latitudes are associated with higher hospitalization rate and mortality rate for COVID-19 worldwide, because vitamin D deficiency is more prevalent in people who live in Northern countries (Panarese and Shahini 2020). There are negative correlations between mean levels of vitamin D in different countries and the number of COVID-19 cases (Ilie et al. 2020). On the other hand, in the body, a decrease in serum vitamin D level may worsen the clinical results of patients with COVID-19 and an increase in serum vitamin D level may improve clinical outcomes in those patients (Alipio 2020).

Vitamin D may protect against symptoms of the COVID-19 infection, especially by increasing the level of ACE2 in the lungs. ACE2, as the key SARS receptor, does play a protective role in the cardiovascular diseases and SARS-mediated ARDS (Imai et al. 2007; Kuba et al. 2013). ACE2 protein treatment inhibited the spreading of SARS and also protect patients with SARS infection from developing lung failure (Kuba et al. 2006). Moreover, a single dose of recombinant human ACE2 treatment prevents pulmonary arterial hypertension both in clinical and preclinical study (Hemnes et al. 2018). A new study showed that human recombinant soluble ACE2 treatment may significantly suppressed early stages of SARS-CoV-2 infections (Monteil et al. 2020)

Consequently, vitamin D treatment may decrease the risk of incidence of the COVID-19 infection by increasing the ACE2 level, as well as decrease the mortality and severity of patients with COVID-19. For that reason, in the new treatment strategies, making plans to increase ACE2 might be successful to fight against the COVID-19 infection.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 43281
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 25 Juin 2020 19:42

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

La vitamine D peut prévenir les dommages à plusieurs organes induits par l'infection par COVID-19
Archives de pharmacologie de Hatice Aygun Naunyn-Schmiedeberg volume 393, pages 1157-1160 (2020)

La vitamine D est une hormone immunomodulatrice à effet anti-inflammatoire et antimicrobien à profil de sécurité élevé. Un grand nombre de patients infectés par COVID-19 développent un syndrome de détresse respiratoire aiguë (SDRA), qui peut entraîner des lésions d'organes multiples. Ces symptômes sont associés à un syndrome de tempête de cytokines. Le but de cette lettre est de noter les 5 points cruciaux que la vitamine D pourrait avoir des effets protecteurs et thérapeutiques contre COVID-19. Pour cette raison, les dommages à plusieurs organes induits par l'infection par COVID-19 pourraient être évités par la vitamine D.

Pour l'éditeur,

J'écris cette lettre dans le but de noter que la vitamine D pourrait avoir des effets protecteurs et thérapeutiques contre COVID-19.

La maladie à coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) continue de se propager très rapidement et de devenir mortelle, car il n'existe pas encore de traitement efficace. Pour cette raison, de nombreux pays ont recours à de sévères précautions de quarantaine afin d'enrayer la propagation et de prévenir les décès.

Il est connu que l'enzyme de conversion de l'angiotensine 2 (ACE2) est le principal récepteur des cellules hôtes de COVID-19. L'ACE2 est exprimée dans les cellules alvéolaires des poumons de type II, les entérocytes absorbants de l'iléon et du côlon, les cellules épithéliales supérieure et stratifiée de l'œsophage, les cellules tubulaires proximales du rein, les cellules myocardiques, les cellules urothéliales de la vessie et les cellules épithéliales de la muqueuse buccale (Zou et al. 2020; Xu et al.2020). L'expression élevée d'ACE2 pourrait être un facteur de risque potentiel pour les voies d'infection de COVID-19. À la suite d'une infection par COVID-19, de nombreux patients développent un syndrome de détresse respiratoire aiguë (SDRA), qui peut entraîner des lésions multiples aux organes. Ces symptômes sont associés à un syndrome de tempête des cytokines, qui pourrait provoquer des réponses déclenchées des cellules T helper1 (Th1). De nombreuses études ont suggéré que des concentrations élevées d'interleukine (IL) -1, IL-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, facteur de stimulation des colonies de granulocytes (GCSF), protéine inductible par l'interféron-γ 10 (IP-10), protéine inflammatoire des macrophages 1-α (MIP-1α), facteur de nécrose tumorale-α (TNF-α), protéine 1 de chimioattractant des monocytes (MCP) -1), et IFN-γ pourrait être trouvé chez les patients infectés par COVID-19 (Conti et al.2020; Chen et al.2020a; Liu et al.2020; Huang et al.2020).

La vitamine D est connue pour jouer un rôle essentiel dans le système immunitaire. Le récepteur de la vitamine D a été exprimé dans plusieurs organes et tissus, notamment le cœur, les poumons, les reins, le foie, le système nerveux, l'intestin, les os, la glande parathyroïde, le système cardiovasculaire et le myocarde (Prufer et al.1999). La vitamine D (Fig.1) pourrait prévenir les dommages à plusieurs organes causés par COVID des cinq manières suivantes:

1.
La vitamine D diminue la production de cellules Th1 (Cantorna et Mahon 2005; Schleithoff et al.2006; Ardizzone et al.2009). Ainsi, il peut supprimer la progression de l'inflammation en réduisant la génération de cytokines inflammatoires telles que l'IL-6, l'IL-8, l'IL-12 et l'IL-17 (Chastre et Fagon 2002; Society et al.2005; Palmer et al. 2011). La vitamine D diminue également la génération de TNFα et de facteur nucléaire κB (NFκB) (Peterson et Heffernan 2008; Talmor et al.2008). De plus, la 1,25 (OH) 2D, forme active biologique de la vitamine D, inhibe directement l'interféron gamma (IFN-γ) et l'IL-2 (Provvedini et al. 1983; Tsoukas et al. 1984). La vitamine D peut réduire le syndrome de la tempête des cytokines chez les patients atteints d'une infection sévère au COVID-19 et ainsi prévenir les dommages à plusieurs organes.

2.
Il a été démontré que lors d'une infection virale, la forme inactive de la vitamine D peut être convertie en forme active par les cellules épithéliales alvéolaires, et l'expression du gène de défense de l'hôte, la cathélicidine, augmente (Hansdottir et al.2008). Il a été démontré que les cathelicidines ont un effet protecteur contre les lésions pulmonaires dues à l'hyperoxie (Jiang et al.2020). La vitamine D pourrait réduire le risque d'infection au COVID-19 en induisant la production de cathélicidine et de défensines, ce qui réduit la survie et la réplication des virus.

3.
Chez l'homme atteint d'insuffisance rénale primaire et secondaire et chez la souris diabétique, une expression accrue de l'ACE2 a été démontrée (Ye et al. 2004; Lely et al. 2004). Il a été démontré que le traitement à la vitamine D inhibe l'expression de l'ACE2 dans le rein (Ali et al.2018). Le 1,25- (OH) 2D3 a montré un effet rénoprotecteur en diminuant le rapport ACE1 et ACE1 / ACE2 chez les rats néphropatiques diabétiques induits par la streptozotocine (Lin et al. 2016). En d'autres termes, le traitement à la vitamine D peut supprimer l'expression de l'ACE2 dans les cellules des tubules rénaux, empêchant ainsi l'entrée du COVID-19 dans la cellule chez les patients diabétiques et protégeant le rein.

4.
L'angiotensine II (Ang II) est une hormone peptidique naturelle du système rénine-angiotensine-aldostérone. Il est surtout connu pour augmenter la pression artérielle en stimulant l'aldostérone et sa vasoconstriction systémique (Li et al. 2004). ACE2 catalyse directement Ang II, abaissant ainsi ses niveaux. L'infection par COVID-19 peut réguler à la baisse l'ACE2, ce qui pourrait entraîner une accumulation excessive d'Ang II. Des niveaux élevés d'Ang II peuvent provoquer des SDRA, une myocardite ou des lésions cardiaques (Hanff et al.2020). La rénine, d'autre part, est une enzyme protéolytique et un régulateur positif de Ang II. La vitamine D est un puissant inhibiteur de la rénine (Li et al. 2004). Une étude a rapporté que les souris dépourvues de récepteurs de vitamine D avaient des niveaux élevés de rénine et d'Ang II (Li et al. 2004). En effet, il a été démontré que le supplément de vitamine D prévient l'accumulation d'Ang II et diminue l'activité pro-inflammatoire d'Ang II en supprimant la libération de rénine chez les patients infectés par COVID, réduisant ainsi le risque de SDRA, de myocardite ou de lésion cardiaque (Hanff et al.2020 ).

5.
Des études épidémiologiques ont rapporté que la mortalité et la gravité de l'infection par le virus COVID-19 sont fortement corrélées avec les personnes âgées et les hommes. On sait que, surtout chez les enfants, le risque de développer une infection au COVID-19 est plus faible et les symptômes sont moins graves. Une étude récente a examiné la relation entre l'expression de l'ACE2 dans les poumons et les souris âgées de 3 mois augmentaient significativement l'expression de l'ACE2 par rapport aux souris de 24 mois (Booeshaghi et Pachter 2020). Il a été démontré que l'expression de l'ACE2 diminue considérablement chez les rats mâles et femelles, et cette diminution est également plus élevée chez les rats femelles que chez les rats mâles (Xudong et al. 2006). L'expression d'ACE2 est généralement plus élevée chez les femmes que chez les hommes et tend à diminuer avec l'âge (Chen et al. 2020b). Les enfants ont une expression d'ACE plus élevée que les adultes (Beneteau-Burnat et al. 1990). L'incidence élevée d'infection à COVID-19 chez les personnes âgées et les hommes peut être associée à une faible expression d'ACE2.

Le coronavirus du syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère (SARSCoV) et la régulation négative de l'ACE2 induite par l'aspiration acide provoquée par un modèle de souris provoquent une gravité de l'insuffisance pulmonaire (Kuba et al.2006). Dans le coronavirus humain-NL63, une régulation négative de la protéine ACE2 a été observée (Dijkman et al. 2012). De même, dans l'infection par COVID-19, le virus se lie aux récepteurs ACE2, suite à une régulation négative de l'ACE2 et ne peut pas remplir sa fonction physiologique. Une diminution de l'expression de l'ACE2 pourrait être un plus grand risque de SDRA, d'inflammation pulmonaire aiguë, de maladies cardiovasculaires, d'hypertension, d'insuffisance cardiaque, de fibrose cardiaque et de maladie rénale chronique (Kuba et al.2006; Sodhi et al.2018; Tikellis et Thomas 2012) .

La carence en vitamine D est un facteur de risque important dans le SDRA ainsi que dans de nombreuses maladies. Il a été signalé qu'un seul traitement préopératoire à haute dose de vitamine D par voie orale prévenait le SDRA en réduisant l'indice de perméabilité vasculaire pulmonaire postopératoire (Parekh et al.2018). Une étude a montré que la vitamine D présente un effet protecteur direct sur l'épithélium alvéolaire et diminue la mort des cellules épithéliales alvéolaires de type 2 dans le modèle de souris ARDS induite par les lipopolysaccharides; en outre, la supplémentation en vitamine D avant l'œsophagectomie prévient le SDRA en réduisant les dommages capillaires alvéolaires, en milieu clinique (Dancer et al. 2015). Une autre étude a démontré que le traitement à la vitamine D avait un effet protecteur sur les poumons en inhibant les niveaux de rénine, d'ECA et d'Ang II et augmentait l'expression du niveau d'ACE2 dans le modèle de lésion pulmonaire aiguë chez l'animal (Xu et al.2017). Le calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamine D3) peut améliorer l'expression de l'ACE2 en ayant un impact prononcé sur la voie ACE2 / Ang (1–7) / MasR (Cui et al.2019).

Ainsi, une carence en vitamine D peut jouer un rôle dans l'augmentation du risque de développer une infection à COVID-19. Récemment, plusieurs études soutenant cette hypothèse ont été publiées. Une étude a rapporté que les latitudes nordiques sont associées à un taux d'hospitalisation et de mortalité plus élevé pour COVID-19 dans le monde, car la carence en vitamine D est plus fréquente chez les personnes vivant dans les pays du Nord (Panarese et Shahini 2020). Il existe des corrélations négatives entre les niveaux moyens de vitamine D dans différents pays et le nombre de cas de COVID-19 (Ilie et al.2020). D'autre part, dans le corps, une diminution du taux sérique de vitamine D peut aggraver les résultats cliniques des patients atteints de COVID-19 et une augmentation du taux sérique de vitamine D peut améliorer les résultats cliniques chez ces patients (Alipio 2020).

La vitamine D peut protéger contre les symptômes de l'infection au COVID-19, en particulier en augmentant le niveau d'ACE2 dans les poumons. L'ACE2, en tant que récepteur clé du SRAS, joue un rôle protecteur dans les maladies cardiovasculaires et les SDRA médiées par le SRAS (Imai et al. 2007; Kuba et al. 2013). Le traitement aux protéines ACE2 a inhibé la propagation du SRAS et protège également les patients infectés par le SRAS de développer une insuffisance pulmonaire (Kuba et al. 2006). De plus, une seule dose de traitement ACE2 humain recombinant prévient l'hypertension artérielle pulmonaire dans les études cliniques et précliniques (Hemnes et al.2018). Une nouvelle étude a montré que le traitement par ACE2 soluble recombinant humain peut considérablement supprimer les premiers stades des infections par le SRAS-CoV-2 (Monteil et al.2020)

Par conséquent, le traitement à la vitamine D peut réduire le risque d'incidence de l'infection au COVID-19 en augmentant le niveau d'ACE2, ainsi que la mortalité et la gravité des patients atteints de COVID-19. Pour cette raison, dans les nouvelles stratégies de traitement, faire des plans pour augmenter l'ACE2 pourrait être efficace pour lutter contre l'infection au COVID-19
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 5455
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 26 Juin 2020 15:46

Covid-19: Public health agencies review whether vitamin D supplements could reduce risk
BMJ 2020; 369

As agencies announce they are examining whether vitamin D supplements could reduce the risk of covid-19, Ingrid Torjesen finds out what the existing evidence shows

Public health agencies in England and Scotland are conducting urgent reviews into the potential for vitamin D to reduce the risk of covid-19.

Among the evidence being examined is a systematic review and meta-analysis published in The BMJ in 2017, which concluded that vitamin D supplementation reduced the risk of acute respiratory infections.1 As the covid-19 pandemic escalated, greater awareness of this paper prompted speculation in the media that supplementation could offer benefits against covid-19. Since the start of the pandemic the review has been viewed online more than 300 000 times and shared more times on social media than any other research paper published in The BMJ in the past three years.

Public Health England (PHE) has confirmed that the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition will examine the findings of the paper as part of a wider review of the evidence on vitamin D supplementation and reduced risk of acute respiratory tract infections.

At the same time, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence is producing a rapid evidence summary on vitamin D supplementation in the context of covid-19 and Public Health Scotland (PHS) is conducting a similar evidence gathering exercise.

“I suspect that they’re going to have problems drawing any definitive conclusion simply because the data are limited,” said Adrian Martineau, professor of respiratory infection and immunity at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, and one of the authors of the BMJ review.

He said that he knew of no laboratory studies that had looked specifically at the impact of vitamin D on immune responses to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Many such studies had investigated other respiratory viruses, however, and found that vitamin D metabolites augment innate antiviral immune responses while simultaneously dampening down inflammation, which has been highlighted as a major problem in covid-19.

“This combination of actions makes vitamin D an interesting candidate both as a potential tool in covid-19 prevention and as an adjunct to other therapies for people who already have the disease,” said Martineau.

He said a few observational studies had linked low vitamin D status to adverse outcomes in covid-19 but said that these were limited by the potential for confounding to explain the associations. Reverse causality could also be operating, he added. “Inflammation itself can disturb vitamin D metabolism and actually render somebody deficient, as we have recently shown in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.”2

PHE updated its advice on vitamin D supplementation in April when it recommended that everyone should consider taking a daily 10 µg vitamin D supplement because lockdown meant that people might not get enough vitamin D from sunlight because of more time being spent indoors. It added that at that time there was not enough evidence to recommend vitamin D supplements specifically for reducing risk of covid-19.3 PHS gave similar advice in June.4

Both PHE and PHS especially recommend vitamin supplementation for people from black and minority ethnic (BAME) groups with dark skin, such as those of African, African-Caribbean, and South Asian origin, who require more sun exposure to make as much vitamin D. There have also been suggestions that vitamin D deficiency may explain why people of BAME backgrounds experience more adverse outcomes from covid-19.

“It’s an interesting hypothesis,” Martineau said. “It’s unlikely that ethnic disparities in covid-19 outcomes will be explained by a single factor. My hunch is that socioeconomic and structural factors will be more contributory than biological ones. Nevertheless, the vitamin D story is worthy of exploration and a major focus of a research study that we’re doing.”

This national longitudinal study—called COVIDENCE UK—is looking to recruit 12 000 people.5 Participants will complete an initial online questionnaire collecting information on determinants of vitamin D status and other putative risk factors, and this information will be linked to notifications of incident covid-19 captured through monthly online follow-up, backed up by linkage to routinely collected health outcome data held by NHS Digital. A randomised controlled trial over the winter is then planned, looking at the potential for different vitamin D supplementation strategies to reduce the risk of covid-19.

Martineau appealed to The BMJ’s readership to sign up at www.qmul.ac.uk/covidence. “Healthcare professionals are at heightened risk of covid-19; it’s vital that they are well represented in our study so that we can identify modifiable risk factors such as vitamin D deficiency as soon as possible. Already 9000 people are taking part, many of them NHS colleagues.”

Regardless of any impact on covid-19, if everyone took a 10 µg daily supplement it would have a real benefit for musculoskeletal health, Martineau added.

“Our unpublished preliminary data indicate that two in three COVIDENCE UK participants are not taking supplemental vitamin D—and they are likely to represent a more health conscious subgroup of the population. Matters of cost and availability limit uptake of this recommendation. One of the questions our trial will look at is whether providing supplements free of charge improves uptake when compared with simply recommending them,” he said.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 43281
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 26 Juin 2020 16:40

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

Covid-19: Les agences de santé publique examinent si les suppléments de vitamine D pourraient réduire le risque
BMJ 2020; 369

Alors que les agences annoncent qu'elles examinent si les suppléments de vitamine D pourraient réduire le risque de covid-19, Ingrid Torjesen découvre ce que les preuves existantes montrent

Les agences de santé publique en Angleterre et en Écosse procèdent à des examens urgents du potentiel de la vitamine D pour réduire le risque de covid-19.

Parmi les preuves examinées figure une revue systématique et une méta-analyse publiées dans le BMJ en 2017, qui ont conclu que la supplémentation en vitamine D réduisait le risque d'infections respiratoires aiguës.1 Alors que la pandémie de Covid-19 s'intensifiait, une plus grande sensibilisation à ce document a incité à la spéculation dans les médias que la supplémentation pourrait offrir des avantages contre covid-19. Depuis le début de la pandémie, la revue a été consultée en ligne plus de 300 000 fois et partagée plus de fois sur les réseaux sociaux que tout autre document de recherche publié dans le BMJ au cours des trois dernières années.

Public Health England (PHE) a confirmé que le Comité consultatif scientifique sur la nutrition examinera les conclusions de l'article dans le cadre d'un examen plus large des données probantes sur la supplémentation en vitamine D et la réduction du risque d'infections aiguës des voies respiratoires.

Dans le même temps, le National Institute for Health and Care Excellence produit un résumé rapide des preuves sur la supplémentation en vitamine D dans le contexte de covid-19 et Public Health Scotland (PHS) mène un exercice de collecte de preuves similaire.

"Je soupçonne qu'ils auront du mal à tirer une conclusion définitive simplement parce que les données sont limitées", a déclaré Adrian Martineau, professeur d'infection respiratoire et d'immunité à Barts et à la London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, et l'un des auteurs de la revue BMJ.

Il a dit qu'il ne connaissait aucune étude de laboratoire qui avait examiné spécifiquement l'impact de la vitamine D sur les réponses immunitaires au virus du SRAS-CoV-2. De nombreuses études de ce type avaient cependant étudié d'autres virus respiratoires et constaté que les métabolites de la vitamine D augmentaient les réponses immunitaires antivirales innées tout en atténuant l'inflammation, ce qui a été souligné comme un problème majeur dans covid-19.

«Cette combinaison d'actions fait de la vitamine D un candidat intéressant à la fois comme outil potentiel dans la prévention de covid-19 et comme complément à d'autres thérapies pour les personnes qui ont déjà la maladie», a déclaré Martineau.

Il a déclaré que quelques études observationnelles avaient lié un faible statut en vitamine D à des résultats indésirables dans covid-19, mais a déclaré que ceux-ci étaient limités par le potentiel de confusion pour expliquer les associations. La causalité inverse pourrait également fonctionner, a-t-il ajouté. «L'inflammation elle-même peut perturber le métabolisme de la vitamine D et rendre une personne déficiente, comme nous l'avons récemment montré chez des patients souffrant d'asthme et de maladie pulmonaire obstructive chronique.» 2

PHE a mis à jour ses conseils sur la supplémentation en vitamine D en avril en recommandant à tout le monde d'envisager de prendre un supplément quotidien de 10 µg de vitamine D car le verrouillage signifiait que les gens pourraient ne pas obtenir suffisamment de vitamine D du soleil en raison du temps passé à l'intérieur. Il a ajouté qu'à cette époque, il n'y avait pas suffisamment de preuves pour recommander des suppléments de vitamine D spécifiquement pour réduire le risque de covid-19.3 PHS a donné des conseils similaires en juin.4

PHE et PHS recommandent en particulier une supplémentation en vitamines pour les personnes de groupes ethniques noirs et minoritaires (BAME) à la peau foncée, comme celles d'origine africaine, afro-caribéenne et sud-asiatique, qui ont besoin de plus d'exposition au soleil pour produire autant de vitamine D. Il a également été suggéré que la carence en vitamine D pourrait expliquer pourquoi les personnes issues du groupe BAME connaissent des résultats plus défavorables avec covid-19.

"C’est une hypothèse intéressante", a expliqué Martineau. "Il est peu probable que les disparités ethniques dans les résultats de Covid-19 soient expliquées par un seul facteur. Mon intuition est que les facteurs socio-économiques et structurels seront plus contributifs que biologiques. Néanmoins, l'histoire de la vitamine D mérite d'être explorée et constitue un axe majeur d'une étude de recherche que nous menons. "

Cette étude longitudinale nationale - appelée COVIDENCE UK - cherche à recruter 12 000 personnes5. Les participants rempliront un premier questionnaire en ligne rassemblant des informations sur les déterminants du statut en vitamine D et d'autres facteurs de risque putatifs, et ces informations seront liées aux notifications d'incident. -19 capturés grâce à un suivi mensuel en ligne, étayé par un lien avec les données sur les résultats de santé collectées régulièrement détenues par NHS Digital. Un essai contrôlé randomisé au cours de l'hiver est alors prévu, examinant le potentiel de différentes stratégies de supplémentation en vitamine D pour réduire le risque de covid-19.

Martineau a appelé le lectorat du BMJ à s’inscrire à www.qmul.ac.uk/covidence. «Les professionnels de la santé courent un risque accru de covid-19; il est essentiel qu'ils soient bien représentés dans notre étude afin que nous puissions identifier dès que possible les facteurs de risque modifiables tels que la carence en vitamine D. Déjà 9 000 personnes y participent, dont beaucoup de collègues du NHS. »

Indépendamment de tout impact sur covid-19, si tout le monde prenait un supplément quotidien de 10 µg, cela aurait un réel avantage pour la santé musculo-squelettique, a ajouté Martineau.

«Nos données préliminaires non publiées indiquent que deux participants à COVIDENCE UK sur trois ne prennent pas de suppléments de vitamine D - et ils sont susceptibles de représenter un sous-groupe plus soucieux de leur santé. Les questions de coût et de disponibilité limitent l'adoption de cette recommandation. L'une des questions que notre essai examinera est de savoir si la fourniture gratuite de suppléments améliore leur utilisation par rapport à leur simple recommandation », at-il déclaré.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 5455
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 11 Juil 2020 11:41

COVID-19 mortality increases with northerly latitude after adjustment for age suggesting a link with ultraviolet and vitamin D
Jonathan Rhodes BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health 2020;3:doi: 10.1136

We read with interest the review by Dr Kohlmeier in which he reported a correlation between COVID-19 mortality among African-Americans across the USA and northern latitude.1 We previously reported a north–south gradient in global COVID-19 mortality but were conscious that lack of ultraviolet exposure and consequent vitamin D insufficiency was not the only possible explanation.2 We have now investigated the relationships between latitude, age of population, population density and pollution with COVID-19 mortality.

COVID-19 mortality per million by country was downloaded from https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/ on 18 May 2020.3 We included all 117 countries with population >1 million and ≥150 COVID-19 cases. Data by country for population %≥65 years, population density and air pollution (particles of matter <2.5 um diameter µg/m3) were obtained from public sources.4–6 Latitude was entered for each country’s capital city. The hypothesis was that there was no relationship between mortality and latitude below a threshold and that thereafter mortality increased with latitude. Mortality data were log transformed, and piecewise linear modelling was used to explore the relationship with latitude. This was adjusted for %≥65, and pollution and population density were investigated to see if they further explained variability in mortality.

The analysis supported the hypothesis with a threshold of 28° north and a model of zero slope below the threshold, and a linear model above the threshold was fitted. The age adjustment was highly significant (p<0.0005), with an estimated mortality increase of 13.7% (95% CI 7.4% to 20.3%) for each 1% increase in %≥65. Latitude was also significant (p=0.031) with an estimated 4.4% (95% CI 0.4% to 8.5%) increase in mortality for each 1° further north (table 1, figure 1). Countries with higher pollution included many with younger populations, and pollution was negatively associated with mortality but added no significant explanatory power to a model containing latitude and age. Population density expressed per country was not significantly associated with mortality.

The proportion of older people in each country impacts greatly on COVID-19 mortality, but after adjustment for this, a strong association remains across the Northern hemisphere between latitude and higher COVID-19 mortality. This association exists above 28° north not far from the latitude, usually stated as 35° north, beyond which populations commonly get insufficient ultraviolet B to maintain normal vitamin D blood levels throughout winter. There are exceptions, but COVID-19 mortality correlates with reported vitamin D levels across Europe,7 and in sunnier Brazil, where mortality is rising, 28% prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is reported.8 An association between vitamin D insufficiency and COVID-19 severity is supported by substantial evidence of its impact on cytokine response to pathogens.7 A direct effect of ultraviolet light on the environmental survival of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is also possible but would not explain the association between mortality and ethnicity,9 whereas people with dark skin need more ultraviolet exposure for equivalent vitamin D synthesis.

This analysis supports the link between latitude and COVID-19 mortality reported within the USA by Dr Kohlmeier.1 Evidence linking vitamin D deficiency with COVID-19 severity is circumstantial but growing. Obtaining more direct evidence may be difficult as people could be reluctant to trial a placebo in place of a vitamin supplement. If the association between vitamin D deficiency and COVID-19 severity is causative, the disease should prove seasonal, since more severely affected individuals are infectious for longer. We agree that very high vitamin D doses >4000 IU/day should only be taken in the context of clinical trials10 but urge that vitamin D supplementation at more moderate dose should be taken by all those at risk of deficiency, including people with darker skin or living in institutions.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 43281
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 12 Juil 2020 08:29

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

La mortalité par COVID-19 augmente avec la latitude nord après ajustement pour l'âge, ce qui suggère un lien avec les ultraviolets et la vitamine D
Jonathan Rhodes BMJ Nutrition, Prévention & Santé 2020; 3: doi: 10.1136

Nous avons lu avec intérêt la revue du Dr Kohlmeier dans laquelle il a signalé une corrélation entre la mortalité par COVID-19 chez les Afro-Américains aux États-Unis et la latitude nord.1 Nous avons précédemment signalé un gradient nord-sud de la mortalité mondiale par COVID-19, mais nous étions conscients que l'absence d'exposition aux ultraviolets et l'insuffisance de vitamine D qui en résulte n'étaient pas la seule explication possible.2 Nous avons maintenant étudié les relations entre la latitude, l'âge de la population, la densité de la population et la pollution avec la mortalité par COVID-19.

La mortalité COVID-19 par million par pays a été téléchargée à partir de https://www.worldometer.info/coronavirus/ le 18 mai 2020.3 Nous avons inclus les 117 pays avec une population> 1 million et ≥150 cas COVID-19. Les données par pays pour la population% ≥65 ans, la densité de la population et la pollution atmosphérique (particules de matière <2,5 µm de diamètre µg / m3) ont été obtenues à partir de sources publiques.4–6 La latitude a été saisie pour la capitale de chaque pays. L'hypothèse était qu'il n'y avait pas de relation entre la mortalité et la latitude en dessous d'un seuil et que par la suite la mortalité augmentait avec la latitude. Les données de mortalité ont été transformées en logarithme et une modélisation linéaire par morceaux a été utilisée pour explorer la relation avec la latitude. Cela a été ajusté pour% ≥65, et la pollution et la densité de population ont été étudiées pour voir si elles expliquaient davantage la variabilité de la mortalité.

L'analyse a confirmé l'hypothèse d'un seuil de 28 ° nord et d'un modèle de pente nulle en dessous du seuil, et un modèle linéaire au-dessus du seuil a été ajusté. L'ajustement en fonction de l'âge était très significatif (p <0,0005), avec une augmentation estimée de la mortalité de 13,7% (IC à 95% de 7,4% à 20,3%) pour chaque augmentation de 1% en% ≥65. La latitude était également significative (p = 0,031) avec une augmentation estimée de 4,4% (IC à 95% de 0,4% à 8,5%) de la mortalité pour chaque 1 ° plus au nord (tableau 1, figure 1). Les pays où la pollution était plus élevée comprenaient un grand nombre de populations plus jeunes, et la pollution était négativement associée à la mortalité mais n'a ajouté aucun pouvoir explicatif significatif à un modèle contenant la latitude et l'âge. La densité de population exprimée par pays n'était pas significativement associée à la mortalité.

La proportion de personnes âgées dans chaque pays a un impact important sur la mortalité par COVID-19, mais après ajustement pour cela, une forte association reste à travers l'hémisphère Nord entre la latitude et une mortalité plus élevée par COVID-19. Cette association existe au-dessus de 28 ° nord non loin de la latitude, généralement indiquée comme 35 ° nord, au-delà de laquelle les populations reçoivent généralement des rayons ultraviolets B insuffisants pour maintenir des niveaux sanguins normaux de vitamine D tout au long de l'hiver. Il existe des exceptions, mais la mortalité par COVID-19 est en corrélation avec les niveaux de vitamine D signalés en Europe 7, et au Brésil plus ensoleillé, où la mortalité augmente, une prévalence de 28% de carence en vitamine D est rapportée.8 Une association entre l'insuffisance en vitamine D et COVID-19 la gravité est étayée par des preuves substantielles de son impact sur la réponse des cytokines aux agents pathogènes.7 Un effet direct de la lumière ultraviolette sur la survie environnementale du coronavirus du syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère 2 est également possible, mais n'expliquerait pas l'association entre la mortalité et l'origine ethnique9, alors que les gens avec une peau foncée ont besoin de plus d'exposition aux ultraviolets pour une synthèse équivalente de vitamine D.

Cette analyse confirme le lien entre la latitude et la mortalité par COVID-19 signalé aux États-Unis par le Dr Kohlmeier.1 Les preuves établissant un lien entre une carence en vitamine D et la gravité de COVID-19 sont circonstancielles mais en augmentation. Il peut être difficile d'obtenir des preuves plus directes, car les gens pourraient hésiter à tester un placebo à la place d'un supplément de vitamines. Si l'association entre la carence en vitamine D et la gravité de COVID-19 est causale, la maladie devrait se révéler saisonnière, car les personnes les plus gravement touchées sont infectieuses plus longtemps. Nous convenons que des doses très élevées de vitamine D> 4000 UI / jour ne doivent être prises que dans le cadre d'essais cliniques10, mais nous demandons instamment qu'une supplémentation en vitamine D à une dose plus modérée soit prise par toutes les personnes à risque de carence, y compris les personnes à vivant en institution.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 5455
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 21 Juil 2020 09:22

Strong Correlation Between Prevalence of Severe Vitamin D Deficiency and Population Mortality Rate from COVID-19 in Europe
Isaac Z Pugach, medRxiv 2020

SARS-CoV-2 virus causes a very wide range of COVID-19 disease severity in humans: from completely asymptomatic to fatal, and the reasons behind it are often not understood. There is some data that Vitamin D may have protective effect, so authors decided to analyze European country-wide data to determine if Vitamin D levels are associated with COVID-19 population death rate.

Methods: To retrieve the Vitamin D levels data, authors analyzed the Vitamin D European population data compiled by 2019 ECTS Statement on Vitamin D Status published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. For the data set to used for analysis, only recently published data, that included general adult population of both genders ages 40-65 or wider, and must have included the prevalence of Vitamin D deficiency.

Results: There were 10 countries data sets that fit the criteria and were analyzed. Severe Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)D less than 25 nmol/L (10 ng/dL). Pearson correlation analysis between death rate per million from COVID-19 and prevalence of severe Vitamin D deficiency shows a strong correlation with r = 0.76, p = 0.01, indicating significant correlation. Correlation remained significant, even after adjusting for age structure of the population. Additionally, over time, correlation strengthened, and r coefficient asymptoticaly increased.

Conclusions: Authors recommend universal screening for Vitamin D deficiency, and further investigation of Vitamin D supplementation in randomized control studies, which may lead to possible treatment or prevention of COVID-19.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 43281
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 21 Juil 2020 16:13

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

Corrélation forte entre la prévalence d'une carence sévère en vitamine D et le taux de mortalité de la population par COVID-19 en Europe
Isaac Z Pugach, medRxiv 2020

Le virus SRAS-CoV-2 provoque une très large gamme de gravité de la maladie COVID-19 chez l'homme: de complètement asymptomatique à mortel, et les raisons qui le sous-tendent ne sont souvent pas comprises. Il existe certaines données selon lesquelles la vitamine D peut avoir un effet protecteur, de sorte que les auteurs ont décidé d'analyser les données nationales européennes pour déterminer si les niveaux de vitamine D sont associés au taux de mortalité de la population COVID-19.

Méthodes: Pour récupérer les données sur les niveaux de vitamine D, les auteurs ont analysé les données sur la population européenne de vitamine D compilées par la déclaration ECTS 2019 sur le statut de la vitamine D publiée dans le European Journal of Endocrinology. Pour l'ensemble de données à utiliser pour l'analyse, seules les données récemment publiées, qui comprenaient la population adulte générale des deux sexes âgée de 40 à 65 ans ou plus, et doivent avoir inclus la prévalence de la carence en vitamine D.

Résultats: Il y avait des ensembles de données de 10 pays qui correspondent aux critères et ont été analysés. Une carence sévère en vitamine D a été définie comme 25 (OH) D inférieure à 25 nmol / L (10 ng / dL). L'analyse de corrélation de Pearson entre le taux de mortalité par million de COVID-19 et la prévalence d'une carence sévère en vitamine D montre une forte corrélation avec r = 0,76, p = 0,01, indiquant une corrélation significative. La corrélation est restée significative, même après ajustement pour la structure par âge de la population. De plus, au fil du temps, la corrélation s'est renforcée et l'asymptoticité du coefficient r a augmenté.

Conclusions: Les auteurs recommandent un dépistage universel de la carence en vitamine D et une enquête plus approfondie sur la supplémentation en vitamine D dans des études contrôlées randomisées, ce qui peut conduire à un traitement ou à une prévention possible du COVID-19.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 5455
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 27 Juil 2020 15:16

Liens ou coïncidence entre les carences en vitamine D et mortalité par COVID?

Image
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 43281
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 27 Juil 2020 15:18

‘Scientific Strabismus’ or two related pandemics: coronavirus disease and vitamin D deficiency
Murat Kara Br J Nutr 2020

The WHO has announced the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak to be a global pandemic. The distribution of community outbreaks shows seasonal patterns along certain latitude, temperature and humidity, that is, similar to the behaviour of seasonal viral respiratory tract infections. COVID-19 displays significant spread in northern mid-latitude countries with an average temperature of 5–11°C and low humidity. Vitamin D deficiency has also been described as pandemic, especially in Europe. Regardless of age, ethnicity and latitude, recent data showed that 40 % of Europeans are vitamin D deficient (25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels <50 nmol/l), and 13 % are severely deficient (25(OH)D < 30 nmol/l). A quadratic relationship was found between the prevalences of vitamin D deficiency in most commonly affected countries by COVID-19 and the latitudes. Vitamin D deficiency is more common in the subtropical and mid-latitude countries than the tropical and high-latitude countries.

The most commonly affected countries with severe vitamin D deficiency are from the subtropical (Saudi Arabia 46 %; Qatar 46 %; Iran 33·4 %; Chile 26·4 %) and mid-latitude (France 27·3 %; Portugal 21·2 %; Austria 19·3 %) regions. Severe vitamin D deficiency was found to be nearly 0 % in some high-latitude countries (e.g. Norway, Finland, Sweden, Denmark and Netherlands). Accordingly, we would like to call attention to the possible association between severe vitamin D deficiency and mortality pertaining to COVID-19. Given its rare side effects and relatively wide safety, prophylactic vitamin D supplementation and/or food fortification might reasonably serve as a very convenient adjuvant therapy for these two worldwide public health problems alike.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 43281
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 27 Juil 2020 18:01

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

«Strabisme scientifique» ou deux pandémies apparentées: maladie à coronavirus et carence en vitamine D
Murat Kara Br J Nutr 2020

L'OMS a annoncé que l'épidémie de nouvelle maladie à coronavirus (COVID-19) était une pandémie mondiale. La répartition des éclosions communautaires montre des tendances saisonnières le long de certaines latitude, température et humidité, c'est-à-dire similaires au comportement des infections virales saisonnières des voies respiratoires. Le COVID-19 présente une propagation significative dans les pays du nord des latitudes moyennes avec une température moyenne de 5 à 11 ° C et une faible humidité. La carence en vitamine D a également été qualifiée de pandémique, notamment en Europe. Indépendamment de l'âge, de l'origine ethnique et de la latitude, des données récentes ont montré que 40% des Européens ont une carence en vitamine D (taux de 25-hydroxyvitamine D (25 (OH) D) <50 nmol / l) et 13% sont gravement déficients (25 (OH) ) D <30 nmol / l). Une relation quadratique a été trouvée entre les prévalences de carence en vitamine D dans les pays les plus fréquemment touchés par le COVID-19 et les latitudes. La carence en vitamine D est plus fréquente dans les pays subtropicaux et de latitude moyenne que dans les pays tropicaux et de haute latitude.

Les pays les plus touchés par une carence sévère en vitamine D sont des pays subtropicaux (Arabie saoudite 46%; Qatar 46%; Iran 33,4%; Chili 26,4%) et des latitudes moyennes (France 27,3%; Portugal 21 · 2%; Autriche 19 · 3%) régions. La carence sévère en vitamine D était de près de 0% dans certains pays des hautes latitudes (par exemple, la Norvège, la Finlande, la Suède, le Danemark et les Pays-Bas). En conséquence, nous souhaitons attirer l'attention sur l'association possible entre une carence sévère en vitamine D et la mortalité liée au COVID-19. Compte tenu de ses effets secondaires rares et de son innocuité relativement large, la supplémentation prophylactique en vitamine D et / ou l'enrichissement des aliments pourraient raisonnablement constituer une thérapie adjuvante très pratique pour ces deux problèmes de santé publique mondiaux.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 5455
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 29 Juil 2020 11:06

Vitamin D and COVID-19: Lessons from Spaceflight Analogs
Sara R Zwart, The Journal of Nutrition, 25 July 2020

The biomedical community is racing to better understand the mechanism of action behind the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that is causing the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Having a better understanding of the mechanism and characteristics that make some individuals more susceptible than others to severe symptoms and preventing viral reactivation in people who have had a history of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 will help protect everyone. We postulate here that vitamin D status may be involved in the severity of the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection.

It is evident that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in COVID-19 pathogenesis (1). Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a protein that mediates blood pressure and promotes inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidant responses through interaction with angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1) (2) (Figure 1). ACE2 converts angiotensin II to angiotensin-(1,7), and the interaction of angiotensin-(1,7) with the Mas receptor counter-regulates the inflammatory effects of angiotensin II (3). Membrane-bound ACE2 was identified as a receptor for SARS-CoV-1, the virus responsible for the 2003 SARS pandemic (4), and ACE2 is also the receptor for SARS-CoV-2 (1). SARS-CoV-2 penetrates epithelial cells by binding its transmembrane spike glycoprotein to membrane-bound ACE2. ACE2 receptors are found in lung (alveolar), heart, kidney, endothelium, and intestine (5), and ACE2 plays an important role in counterbalancing the negative proinflammatory downstream effects triggered by angiotensin II binding to AT1. Although SARS-CoV-2 must bind with ACE2 to penetrate cells, it also simultaneously downregulates ACE2, subsequently causing the receptors to lose function (6). ACE2 is critical for protecting against tissue damage, so loss of function of ACE2 can promote acute lung damage caused by angiotensin II (4, 7).

Preliminary data show that the mortality rate from COVID-19 is lower in countries proximal to the equator compared with more distal countries (8). A higher rate of infection and mortality exists among the elderly, and although all ethnic populations are affected, the death rate among African Americans is disproportionately higher than in other populations (9, 10). One possible explanation for these trends is vitamin D status.

Vitamin D is a unique nutrient in that it can be synthesized in the skin from 7-dehydrocholesterol after UV-B exposure from the sun. It is found naturally in relatively few foods. Vitamin D that is synthesized in the skin or is available from food and/or supplements is hydroxylated in the liver by the enzyme 25-hydroxylase to form 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. 25(OH)D is converted to the biologically active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], by the enzyme 1-ɑ-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), mainly in the kidneys. 1,25(OH)2D has many roles in the body, and vitamin D receptors are present in many types of tissue, but perhaps the most well-known function of vitamin D is its endocrine-related role in the homeostasis of calcium and other minerals. Some paracrine and autocrine mechanisms of action depend on vitamin D substrates, and some cells including B cells, T cells, and antigen-presenting cells can locally convert 25(OH)D to the 1,25(OH)2D form (11) and upregulate >200 genes in tissues that have 1-ɑ-hydroxylase activity (12).

It is estimated that ∼1 billion people worldwide are vitamin D deficient [i.e., circulating 25(OH)D concentrations <20 ng/mL] and 50% of the population have insufficient vitamin D status (< 30 ng/mL) (13). Aging decreases the ability of the skin to synthesize vitamin D, and increased skin pigmentation reduces the efficacy of UV-B to stimulate synthesis of vitamin D (14, 15). It is well known that individuals living farther from the equator have lower vitamin D status (13, 16), and concentrations are lower in individuals with darker skin pigmentation (15). The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is highest in the elderly (61%) (17), the obese (35% higher than in nonobese) (18), nursing home residents (50–60% of nursing home and hospitalized patients) (13), and those with higher melanin in their skin (40%) (19).

How could vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency possibly affect SARS-CoV-2 severity and mortality? The answer may be related to the paracrine and autocrine actions of vitamin D. All cells of the immune system express, or have the ability to express, vitamin D receptors, and all are sensitive to 1,25(OH)2D (12). Vitamin D can influence the immune system in a number of ways, including inhibition of B-cell proliferation and differentiation as well as inhibition of T-cell proliferation (11). Vitamin D also facilitates an induction of T-regulatory cells, resulting in decreased production of inflammatory cytokines and an increase in anti-inflammatory cytokine production (11). SARS-CoV-2 infection results in an aggressive inflammatory response (20), and it is possible that adequate vitamin D status may blunt the production of inflammatory cytokines during infection. Vitamin D is also a negative regulator of the RAS, and this regulation is independent of calcium metabolism (21). 1,25(OH)2D can increase ACE2 expression and attenuate the angiotensin II–induced inflammatory response that includes generation of reactive oxygen species and vasoconstriction (22), which is the pathway that is stimulated during SARS-CoV-2 infection (7). 1,25(OH)2D can alleviate lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury through this mechanism (23).

In 2011, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee reviewed dietary requirements for vitamin D (24) and acknowledged that nonskeletal effects of vitamin D may exist, but they determined that there was not enough evidence at the time to define an RDA based on these factors that went beyond optimizing skeletal health (25). A comprehensive review of the effects of vitamin D supplementation on influenza concluded that vitamin D has some protective effect in reducing the risk of influenza, but more large clinical trials are necessary to confirm this observation (26). A recent review from Grant and colleagues (27) summarizes protective effects of vitamin D against other enveloped viral infections, including dengue, hepatitis B and C, HIV-1, H9N2 influenza, rotavirus, and respiratory syncytial virus. Additionally, a systematic review and meta-analysis by Martineau et al. documented that vitamin D supplementation reduced the risk of acute respiratory infections (28).

There is some evidence that individuals can test positive despite earlier recovery from SARS-CoV-2 infection (29). It is possible that the virus may persist in the body due to slower viral clearance in some individuals (30, 31). Some viruses, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), and herpes-simplex-virus-1 (HSV-1), are known to persist in the body and can reactivate in response to certain stressors. Several case studies show evidence of VZV reactivation with SARS-CoV-2 infection (32, 33). We and others have documented factors that contribute to viral reactivation in astronauts during spaceflight and in spaceflight analog studies, such as those with crews wintering over in Antarctica. The advantage of these models is that viral reactivation can be studied in otherwise healthy individuals who are exposed to environmental and psychological stressors that result in latent viral reactivation (34–38).

Some of the factors that influence viral reactivation in spaceflight and spaceflight analogs include cardiorespiratory fitness level and skeletal muscle endurance (39), stress (40), and stress combined with vitamin D status (41). Astronauts with greater cardiorespiratory fitness had a 29% less risk of latent virus reactivation, and crewmembers with greater preflight upper body muscular endurance were ∼40% less likely to shed latent viruses during long-duration spaceflights, especially EBV and VZV (39). In a vitamin D supplementation study, subjects wintering over in Antarctica with lower vitamin D status and higher serum cortisol shed more EBV in their saliva than did subjects with higher vitamin D concentrations (41). Also of note in that study, the change in serum 25(OH)D response after either a daily 2000-IU or weekly 10,000-IU supplement of vitamin D depended on both BMI and baseline 25(OH)D concentration. In this, and other (42) studies, subjects with a higher BMI had less of a serum 25(OH)D response to supplementation, possibly because of decreased bioavailability of vitamin D in adipose tissue. Additionally, subjects with lower baseline concentrations of vitamin D had a greater elevation of serum 25(OH)D after supplementation. The association between vitamin D and viral reactivation was only present when serum cortisol concentrations were high. These data suggest that higher vitamin D status, along with physical fitness, may help protect against reactivation of latent viruses in high-stress environments, and the amount of vitamin D required to increase serum 25(OH)D depends on BMI and baseline status.

As others have mentioned, it is unlikely that one silver bullet will end the COVID-19 pandemic; however, evidence-based recommendations can be made that may reduce the risk of a severe response to SARS-CoV-2 infection or viral reactivation. Simpson and Katsanis (43) have reported the benefits of exercising during the COVID-19 pandemic that was based on the evidence they found in their spaceflight research. We recommend that people maintain optimal vitamin D status to support immune function and lower their risk of viral reactivation, a recommendation that also comes from our National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)–funded research. We are not advocating for ultra-high doses of vitamin D supplementation because of possible side effects, but rather a level of supplementation that will prevent vitamin D deficiency and maintain serum concentrations >30 ng/mL. We determined from our Antarctic research that doses of 1000–2000 IU/d, which are within IOM guidelines (24), are likely sufficient. Modifiable measures such as these may have the potential to safely and easily offer some protection and reduce risk.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 43281
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 29 Juil 2020 11:12

Image
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 43281
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 29 Juil 2020 15:56

Traduction de l’étude :wink:

Vitamine D et COVID-19: leçons tirées des analogues du vol spatial
Sara R Zwart, The Journal of Nutrition, 25 juillet 2020

La communauté biomédicale s'empresse de mieux comprendre le mécanisme d'action derrière le coronavirus 2 du syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère (SARS-CoV-2), le virus à l'origine de la pandémie de la maladie à coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). Une meilleure compréhension du mécanisme et des caractéristiques qui rendent certaines personnes plus sensibles que d'autres aux symptômes graves et la prévention de la réactivation virale chez les personnes qui ont déjà été exposées au SRAS-CoV-2 aidera à protéger tout le monde. Nous postulons ici que le statut en vitamine D peut être impliqué dans la sévérité de la réponse immunitaire à l'infection par le SRAS-CoV-2.

Il est évident que le système rénine-angiotensine (RAS) est impliqué dans la pathogenèse du COVID-19 (1). L'enzyme de conversion de l'angiotensine (ECA) convertit l'angiotensine I en angiotensine II, une protéine qui médie la pression artérielle et favorise l'inflammation, la fibrose et les réponses oxydantes par interaction avec le récepteur de l'angiotensine II de type I (AT1) (2) (Figure 1). L'ACE2 convertit l'angiotensine II en angiotensine- (1,7), et l'interaction de l'angiotensine- (1,7) avec le récepteur Mas contre-régule les effets inflammatoires de l'angiotensine II (3). L'ACE2 lié à la membrane a été identifié comme un récepteur du SRAS-CoV-1, le virus responsable de la pandémie de SRAS de 2003 (4), et l'ACE2 est également le récepteur du SRAS-CoV-2 (1). Le SARS-CoV-2 pénètre dans les cellules épithéliales en liant sa glycoprotéine de pointe transmembranaire à l'ACE2 liée à la membrane. Les récepteurs ACE2 se trouvent dans les poumons (alvéolaires), le cœur, les reins, l'endothélium et l'intestin (5), et l'ACE2 joue un rôle important dans le contrepoids des effets pro-inflammatoires négatifs en aval déclenchés par la liaison de l'angiotensine II à AT1. Bien que le SRAS-CoV-2 doive se lier à l'ACE2 pour pénétrer dans les cellules, il régule également simultanément l'ACE2, entraînant par la suite une perte de fonction des récepteurs (6). L'ACE2 est essentiel pour se protéger contre les lésions tissulaires, de sorte que la perte de fonction de l'ACE2 peut favoriser des lésions pulmonaires aiguës causées par l'angiotensine II (4, 7).

Les données préliminaires montrent que le taux de mortalité dû au COVID-19 est plus faible dans les pays proches de l'équateur que dans les pays plus distaux (8). Un taux d'infection et de mortalité plus élevé existe chez les personnes âgées, et bien que toutes les populations ethniques soient touchées, le taux de mortalité chez les Afro-Américains est disproportionnellement plus élevé que dans les autres populations (9, 10). Une explication possible de ces tendances est le statut en vitamine D.

La vitamine D est un nutriment unique en ce sens qu'elle peut être synthétisée dans la peau à partir du 7-déhydrocholestérol après une exposition aux UV-B du soleil. Il se trouve naturellement dans relativement peu d'aliments. La vitamine D qui est synthétisée dans la peau ou qui est disponible dans les aliments et / ou les compléments alimentaires est hydroxylée dans le foie par l'enzyme 25-hydroxylase pour former la 25-hydroxyvitamine D [25 (OH) D]. Le 25 (OH) D est converti en forme biologiquement active, la 1,25-dihydroxyvitamine D [1,25 (OH) 2D], par l'enzyme 1-ɑ-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), principalement dans les reins. La 1,25 (OH) 2D joue de nombreux rôles dans l'organisme et les récepteurs de la vitamine D sont présents dans de nombreux types de tissus, mais la fonction la plus connue de la vitamine D est peut-être son rôle endocrinien dans l'homéostasie du calcium et d'autres minéraux. Certains mécanismes d'action paracrines et autocrines dépendent des substrats de la vitamine D, et certaines cellules, notamment les cellules B, les cellules T et les cellules présentatrices d'antigènes, peuvent convertir localement 25 (OH) D en forme 2D 1,25 (OH) (11) et réguler à la hausse> 200 gènes dans les tissus qui ont une activité 1-ɑ-hydroxylase (12).

On estime à environ 1 milliard de personnes dans le monde une carence en vitamine D [c'est-à-dire des concentrations circulantes de 25 (OH) D <20 ng / mL] et 50% de la population ont un statut en vitamine D insuffisant (<30 ng / mL) (13) . Le vieillissement diminue la capacité de la peau à synthétiser la vitamine D et une pigmentation accrue de la peau réduit l'efficacité des UV-B pour stimuler la synthèse de la vitamine D (14, 15). Il est bien connu que les personnes vivant plus loin de l'équateur ont un statut en vitamine D inférieur (13, 16) et que les concentrations sont plus faibles chez les personnes dont la peau est plus foncée (15). La prévalence de la carence en vitamine D est la plus élevée chez les personnes âgées (61%) (17), les obèses (35% plus élevée que chez les non-obèses) (18), les résidents des maisons de retraite (50 à 60% des patients en maison de retraite et hospitalisés) (13 ) et ceux dont la peau contient plus de mélanine (40%) (19).

Comment une carence ou une insuffisance en vitamine D pourrait-elle affecter la gravité et la mortalité du SRAS-CoV-2? La réponse peut être liée aux actions paracrine et autocrine de la vitamine D. Toutes les cellules du système immunitaire expriment, ou ont la capacité d'exprimer, des récepteurs de la vitamine D, et toutes sont sensibles à 1,25 (OH) 2D (12). La vitamine D peut influencer le système immunitaire de plusieurs manières, y compris l'inhibition de la prolifération et de la différenciation des cellules B ainsi que l'inhibition de la prolifération des cellules T (11). La vitamine D facilite également l'induction de cellules T régulatrices, entraînant une diminution de la production de cytokines inflammatoires et une augmentation de la production de cytokines anti-inflammatoires (11). L'infection par le SRAS-CoV-2 entraîne une réponse inflammatoire agressive (20) et il est possible qu'un statut adéquat en vitamine D puisse réduire la production de cytokines inflammatoires pendant l'infection. La vitamine D est également un régulateur négatif du RAS, et cette régulation est indépendante du métabolisme du calcium (21). La 1,25 (OH) 2D peut augmenter l'expression de l'ACE2 et atténuer la réponse inflammatoire induite par l'angiotensine II qui comprend la génération d'espèces réactives de l'oxygène et la vasoconstriction (22), qui est la voie qui est stimulée pendant l'infection par le SRAS-CoV-2 (7) . La 1,25 (OH) 2D peut atténuer les lésions pulmonaires aiguës induites par les lipopolysaccharides grâce à ce mécanisme (23).
En 2011, le comité de l'Institute of Medicine (IOM) a examiné les besoins alimentaires en vitamine D (24) et a reconnu que des effets non squelettiques de la vitamine D pouvaient exister, mais ils ont déterminé qu'il n'y avait pas suffisamment de preuves à l'époque pour définir une RDA basée sur ces facteurs qui allaient au-delà de l'optimisation de la santé du squelette (25). Un examen complet des effets de la supplémentation en vitamine D sur la grippe a conclu que la vitamine D a un certain effet protecteur pour réduire le risque de grippe, mais des essais cliniques plus importants sont nécessaires pour confirmer cette observation (26). Une étude récente de Grant et ses collègues (27) résume les effets protecteurs de la vitamine D contre d'autres infections virales enveloppées, notamment la dengue, les hépatites B et C, le VIH-1, la grippe H9N2, le rotavirus et le virus respiratoire syncytial. De plus, une revue systématique et une méta-analyse de Martineau et al. ont documenté que la supplémentation en vitamine D réduisait le risque d'infections respiratoires aiguës (28).

Il existe des preuves que les individus peuvent être testés positifs malgré une guérison précoce d'une infection par le SRAS-CoV-2 (29). Il est possible que le virus persiste dans l'organisme en raison d'une clairance virale plus lente chez certains individus (30, 31). Certains virus, tels que le virus Epstein-Barr (EBV), le virus varicelle-zona (VZV) et le virus herpès simplex-1 (HSV-1), sont connus pour persister dans l'organisme et peuvent se réactiver en réponse à certains facteurs de stress . Plusieurs études de cas montrent des preuves de réactivation du VZV avec une infection par le SRAS-CoV-2 (32, 33). Nous et d'autres avons documenté les facteurs qui contribuent à la réactivation virale chez les astronautes pendant les vols spatiaux et dans les études analogiques de vols spatiaux, tels que ceux dont les équipages hivernent en Antarctique. L'avantage de ces modèles est que la réactivation virale peut être étudiée chez des individus par ailleurs en bonne santé qui sont exposés à des facteurs de stress environnementaux et psychologiques qui entraînent une réactivation virale latente (34–38).

Certains des facteurs qui influencent la réactivation virale dans les vols spatiaux et les analogues des vols spatiaux comprennent le niveau de forme cardiorespiratoire et l'endurance des muscles squelettiques (39), le stress (40) et le stress combiné au statut en vitamine D (41). Les astronautes ayant une meilleure forme cardiorespiratoire avaient 29% moins de risque de réactivation virale latente, et les membres d'équipage avec une plus grande endurance musculaire avant le vol du haut du corps étaient ∼40% moins susceptibles de répandre des virus latents pendant les vols spatiaux de longue durée, en particulier EBV et VZV (39). Dans une étude de supplémentation en vitamine D, des sujets hivernant en Antarctique avec un statut en vitamine D inférieur et un cortisol sérique plus élevé ont perdu plus d'EBV dans leur salive que les sujets ayant des concentrations de vitamine D plus élevées (41). Il convient également de noter que dans cette étude, le changement de la réponse sérique au 25 (OH) D après un supplément quotidien de 2000 UI ou hebdomadaire de 10000 UI de vitamine D dépendait à la fois de l'IMC et de la concentration initiale de 25 (OH) D. Dans cette étude et dans d'autres études (42), les sujets ayant un IMC plus élevé avaient moins de réponse sérique de 25 (OH) D à la supplémentation, probablement en raison d'une diminution de la biodisponibilité de la vitamine D dans le tissu adipeux. De plus, les sujets avec des concentrations de base plus faibles de vitamine D avaient une plus grande élévation du sérum 25 (OH) D après la supplémentation. L'association entre la vitamine D et la réactivation virale n'était présente que lorsque les concentrations sériques de cortisol étaient élevées. Ces données suggèrent qu'un statut en vitamine D plus élevé, ainsi qu'une forme physique, peuvent aider à protéger contre la réactivation des virus latents dans des environnements à stress élevé, et la quantité de vitamine D nécessaire pour augmenter le sérum 25 (OH) D dépend de l'IMC et de l'état de base.

Comme d'autres l'ont mentionné, il est peu probable qu'une solution miracle mettra fin à la pandémie de COVID-19; cependant, des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes peuvent être faites qui peuvent réduire le risque de réponse grave à l'infection par le SRAS-CoV-2 ou à la réactivation virale. Simpson et Katsanis (43) ont rapporté les avantages de l'exercice pendant la pandémie de COVID-19 sur la base des preuves qu'ils ont trouvées dans leurs recherches sur les vols spatiaux. Nous recommandons aux gens de maintenir un statut optimal en vitamine D pour soutenir la fonction immunitaire et réduire leur risque de réactivation virale, une recommandation qui provient également de notre recherche financée par la National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Nous ne préconisons pas des doses ultra-élevées de supplémentation en vitamine D en raison des effets secondaires possibles, mais plutôt un niveau de supplémentation qui préviendra une carence en vitamine D et maintiendra les concentrations sériques> 30 ng / mL. Nous avons déterminé à partir de nos recherches antarctiques que des doses de 1 000 à 2 000 UI / j, qui sont conformes aux directives de l'OIM (24), sont probablement suffisantes. Des mesures modifiables comme celles-ci peuvent potentiellement offrir une protection sûre et simple et réduire les risques.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 5455
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 6 Aoû 2020 11:26

Low plasma 25(OH) vitamin D level is associated with increased risk of COVID‐19 infection: an Israeli population‐based study
Eugene Merzon febs J 23 July 2020

Aim
To evaluate associations of plasma 25(OH)D status with the likelihood of coronavirus disease (COVID‐19) infection and hospitalization.

Methods
The study population included the 14,000 members of Leumit Health Services who were tested for COVID‐19 infection from February 1st to April 30th 2020, and who had at least one previous blood test for plasma 25(OH)D level. "Suboptimal" or "low" plasma 25(OH)D level was defined as plasma 25‐hydroxyvitamin D, or 25(OH)D, concentration below the level of 30 ng/mL.

Results
Of 7,807 individuals, 782 (10.1%) were COVID‐19‐positive, and 7,025 (89.9%) COVID‐19‐negative. The mean plasma vitamin D level was significantly lower among those who tested positive than negative for COVID‐19 [19.00 ng/mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 18.41‐19.59) vs . 20.55 (95% CI 20.32‐20.78)]. Univariate analysis demonstrated an association between low plasma 25(OH)D level and increased likelihood of COVID‐19 infection [crude odds ratio (OR) of 1.58 (95% CI 1.24‐2.01, p<0.001)], and of hospitalization due to the SARS‐CoV‐2 virus [crude OR of 2.09 (95% CI 1.01‐ 4.30, p<0.05)]. In multivariate analyses that controlled for demographic variables, and psychiatric and somatic disorders, the adjusted OR of COVID‐19 infection [1.45 (95% CI 1.08‐1.95, p<0.001)], and of hospitalization due to the SARS‐CoV‐2 virus [1.95 (95% CI 0.98‐4.845, p=0.061)] were preserved. In the multivariate analyses, age over 50 years, male gender and low‐medium socioeconomic status were also positively associated with the risk of COVID‐19 infection; age over 50 years was positively associated with the likelihood of hospitalization due to COVID‐19.

Conclusion
Low plasma 25(OH)D level appears to be an independent risk factor for COVID‐19 infection and hospitalization.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 43281
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

PrécédenteSuivante

Retourner vers Actualités, vidéos, études scientifiques

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: Nutrimuscle-Conseils et 14 invités