Nutrimuscle Forum : Mobile & Tablette

Vitamine D et virus?

Actualités sport, fitness & musculation, vidéos des pros, études scientifiques. Discutez avec la communauté Nutrimuscle et partagez votre expérience...

Modérateurs: Nutrimuscle-Conseils, Nutrimuscle-Diététique

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 11 Déc 2021 17:32

Role of Vitamin D in COVID-19: Active or Passive?
Bess Dawson-Hughes The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 106, Issue 12, December 2021, Pages e5260–e5261

Amidst a raging pandemic, Nogues et al. developed and implemented a protocol to determine whether treatment with calcifediol compared with no calcifediol altered the course of 838 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients admitted to a hospital in Barcelona, Spain (1). This was not a classical randomized, controlled trial, but rather a real-world examination of outcomes of patients assigned (on a bed availability basis) to 1 of 8 COVID wards, 3 of which had chosen not to administer calcifediol and 5 that had chosen to do so. Other practices in the 8 wards were standardized. Some patients did not have serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) measurements upon admission for reasons related to staff availability. The supplemented patients had significantly fewer transfers to the intensive care unit (adjusted odds ratio, 0.13 [95% CI, 0.07-0.23]) and lower mortality rates (adjusted odds ratio, 0.52 [95% CI, 0.27-0.99]) than the unsupplemented patients, findings that have important implications for the in-hospital management of COVID-19 patients globally.

25(OH)D was measured in 678 of the 838 patients upon admission to the hospital. It was notable that the median 25(OH)D level was 13 [interquartile values 8, 24] ng/mL in the calcifediol-treated group and 12 [8, 19] ng/mL in the untreated control group. How might we interpret the significance of these very low 25(OH)D levels at the time of hospitalization? Was low 25(OH)D a predisposing factor to serious COVID-19 infection or was it a marker of inflammation associated with acute illness? The answer has implications for patient care.

A Predisposing Factor
The patients’ values, measured in March through May 2020, were far lower than those expected in the general population, even for the early spring, when levels tend to be lowest in the Northern hemisphere. Barcelona has a similar latitude to Boston (41.4 vs 42.4 degrees N). In a cross-sectional study of older postmenopausal women not taking vitamin D supplements, mean 25(OH)D levels in Boston in March, April, and May were 22, 23, and 28 ng/mL, respectively (2). These values are consistently higher than the median levels of 12 and 13 ng/mL reported by Nogues (1). Although the assays used by Nogues and Krall were not standardized to the same reference material, the values that Nogues et al. documented are much lower than expected, consistent with the concept that COVID-19 severe enough to require hospitalization occurred more frequently in the segment of the Barcelona population with low rather than representative 25(OH)D values. Although relevant evidence is inconsistent (3, 4), it is plausible that vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were a risk factor for severe COVID-19 infection requiring hospitalization.

A Marker of Severe Illness
An alternative explanation of the very low 25(OH)D values reported by Nogues et al. is worth considering. The patients may have had 25(OH)D levels that were representative of those in the Barcelona area before contracting COVID-19, but their COVID-19 illness caused these levels to decline precipitously. Acute illness with high levels of inflammation has been associated with very low 25(OH)D levels in several studies, including one conducted in Barcelona before the COVID-19 pandemic (January-November 2015), in which 135 patients were admitted to a university hospital intensive care unit for a variety of illnesses. These patients had a mean 25(OH)D level of 11 ng/mL (range, 7-20 ng/mL) (5), and nonsurvivors had significantly lower 25(OH)D levels than survivors (median, 8.1 ng/mL [interquartile values 6.2, 11.5] vs 12.0 ng/mL [7.1, 20.3].

The robust positive response to supplementation observed by Nogues et al. would seem unlikely in patients who had low 25(OH)D levels solely on the basis of critical illness and is consistent with the notion that vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is a contributing factor in the development and progression of COVID-19. If so, this would support the rationale not only for supplementation during hospitalization, but also for avoiding vitamin D deficiency, as a safe and low-cost measure to prevent COVID-19 infection.

A specific COVID-19-related guideline for vitamin D intake is premature; however, it does seem prudent during the pandemic to adhere to current vitamin D intake recommendations with greater attention and urgency. The National Academy of Medicine recommendation of 800 IU per day of vitamin D for older adults is based on evidence that it benefits the skeleton (6), but evidence is expanding that this level of intake may also reduce risk of infection. In an individual participant data meta-analysis of trials conducted before the COVID-19 pandemic, Martineau et al. found that daily or weekly doses of vitamin D reduced risk of acute respiratory infections, with doses < 800 IU/d lowering risk by 20% and doses of 800 to 2000 IU/d lowering it similarly, by 19% (7). Moreover, the benefit of supplementation appeared to be greater among those with 25(OH)D levels below 20 ng/mL than in those with higher 25(OH)D levels. The work of Nogues et al. extends current evidence, by adding COVID-19 to the list of infections that are likely mitigated by maintaining an optimal vitamin D status. Finally, as previously noted (8), the favorable effects of vitamin D on bone and muscle provide a strong rationale for maintaining vitamin D adequacy after hospital discharge in COVID-19 survivors who face an arduous rehabilitation process.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 11 Déc 2021 19:05

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 14 Déc 2021 13:46

Association between vitamin D status and risk of covid-19 in-hospital mortality: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies
Armin Ebrahimzadeh Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 09 Dec 2021

Some earlier studies reported higher risk of COVID-19 mortality in patients with vitamin D deficiency, while some others failed to find such as association. Due to inconsistences between earlier meta-analyses and needs for an updated study, we conducted current systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between vitamin D status and risk of COVID-19 in-hospital mortality among observational studies. We searched PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science up to 27 July 2021.

We conduct our systematic review and meta-analysis in according to PRISM statement. Two authors independently screened studies and extracted data from the relevant ones. All types of observational studies about the association between vitamin D status and in hospital COVID-19 mortality were included. Data was pooled using a random-effect model. P-values ˂ 0.05 was assumed as statistically significant.

We identified 13 observational studies. Pooling 9 studies which categorized vitamin D level, a significant positive relationship was found between vitamin D deficiency and risk of COVID-19 in-hospital mortality (Odds Ratio (OR): 2.11; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.03, 4.32). All subgroup analyses also showed significant relationship between vitamin D deficiency and risk of COVID-19 in-hospital mortality. In the other analysis, pooling data from 5 studies in which vitamin D level was entered as a continues variable, we found an inverse significant association between each unit increment in serum vitamin D concentrations and risk of COVID-19 in-hospital mortality (OR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.99).

We found a significant direct association between vitamin D deficiency and elevated risk of COVID-19 in-hospital mortality. Moreover, each unit increment in serum vitamin D levels was associated to significant reduction in risk of COVID-19 mortality. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm our findings.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 15 Déc 2021 17:59

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

Association entre le statut en vitamine D et le risque de mortalité hospitalière liée au covid-19 : une revue systématique et une méta-analyse d'études observationnelles
Avis critiques d'Armin Ebrahimzadeh en science alimentaire et nutrition 09 décembre 2021

Certaines études antérieures ont signalé un risque plus élevé de mortalité par COVID-19 chez les patients présentant une carence en vitamine D, tandis que d'autres n'ont pas réussi à trouver une telle association. En raison des incohérences entre les méta-analyses précédentes et les besoins d'une étude mise à jour, nous avons mené une revue systématique et une méta-analyse actuelles sur l'association entre le statut en vitamine D et le risque de mortalité hospitalière liée au COVID-19 parmi les études observationnelles. Nous avons effectué des recherches dans PubMed, Scopus et Web of Science jusqu'au 27 juillet 2021.

Nous menons notre revue systématique et notre méta-analyse conformément à la déclaration PRISM. Deux auteurs ont indépendamment passé au crible les études et extrait les données des études pertinentes. Tous les types d'études observationnelles sur l'association entre le statut en vitamine D et la mortalité hospitalière COVID-19 ont été inclus. Les données ont été regroupées à l'aide d'un modèle à effets aléatoires. Des valeurs p 0,05 ont été supposées statistiquement significatives.

Nous avons identifié 13 études observationnelles. En regroupant 9 études qui ont classé le niveau de vitamine D, une relation positive significative a été trouvée entre la carence en vitamine D et le risque de mortalité hospitalière liée au COVID-19 (rapport de cotes (OR) : 2,11 ; intervalle de confiance à 95 % (IC) : 1,03, 4,32) . Toutes les analyses de sous-groupes ont également montré une relation significative entre la carence en vitamine D et le risque de mortalité hospitalière liée au COVID-19. Dans l'autre analyse, en regroupant les données de 5 études dans lesquelles le niveau de vitamine D a été entré comme variable continue, nous avons trouvé une association significative inverse entre chaque incrément unitaire des concentrations sériques de vitamine D et le risque de mortalité hospitalière COVID-19 (OR : 0,94 ; IC à 95 % : 0,89, 0,99).

Nous avons trouvé une association directe significative entre une carence en vitamine D et un risque élevé de mortalité hospitalière liée au COVID-19. De plus, chaque augmentation unitaire des taux sériques de vitamine D était associée à une réduction significative du risque de mortalité par COVID-19. D'autres études prospectives sont nécessaires pour confirmer nos résultats.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 12698
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 17 Déc 2021 13:36

Nutrimuscle-Conseils a écrit: cholesterol may expose the receptor-binding domain by destabilizing the closed structure, preferentially binding to a different site in the hinge region of the open structure.


HDL proteome remodeling associates with COVID-19 severity
Douglas Ricardo Souza Junior October 31, 2021

Highlights
• HDL participates in inflammatory and immune responses.
• Alterations in HDL's protein cargo associate with COVID-19 severity.
• HDL proteome acquires a pro-inflammatory profile in hospitalized COVID-19 patients.
• HDL proteome was able to classify COVID-19 subjects according to disease severity.

• HDL-associated APOM was inversely associated with odds of death due to COVID-19.

Besides the well-accepted role in lipid metabolism, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) also seems to participate in host immune response against infectious diseases.
Objective: We used a quantitative proteomic approach to test the hypothesis that alterations in HDL proteome associate with severity of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
Methods
Based on clinical criteria, subjects (n=41) diagnosed with COVID-19 were divided into two groups: a group of subjects presenting mild symptoms and a second group displaying severe symptoms and requiring hospitalization. Using a proteomic approach, we quantified the levels of 29 proteins in HDL particles derived from these subjects.
Results
We showed that the levels of serum amyloid A 1 and 2 (SAA1 and SAA2, respectively), pulmonary surfactant-associated protein B (SFTPB), apolipoprotein F (APOF), and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4) were increased by more than 50% in hospitalized patients, independently of sex, HDL-C or triglycerides when comparing with subjects presenting only mild symptoms. Altered HDL proteins were able to classify COVID-19 subjects according to the severity of the disease (error rate 4.9%). Moreover, apolipoprotein M (APOM) in HDL was inversely associated with odds of death due to COVID-19 complications (odds ratio [OR] per 1-SD increase in APOM was 0.27, with 95% confidence interval [CI] of 0.07 to 0.72, P=0.007).

Conclusion
Our results point to a profound inflammatory remodeling of HDL proteome tracking with severity of COVID-19 infection. They also raise the possibility that HDL particles could play an important role in infectious diseases.


Introduction
Subjects suffering from Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) experience a wide range of symptoms, from changes of taste and dry cough to fever, to shortness of breath, and thrombotic complications.1 They may also present several clinical changes, including hyperinflammation2 and endothelial dysfunction.3 Alterations in lipid profile, i.e. HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride (TG) levels have also been linked to disease severity.4, 5, 6, 7, 8 Three different studies found an inverse correlation between HDL-C levels and COVID-19 severity.5, 6, 7 Moreover, patients with severe COVID-19 evolution had lower HDL-C and higher triglyceride levels before the infection.8
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 18 Déc 2021 16:39

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

le cholestérol peut exposer le domaine de liaison au récepteur en déstabilisant la structure fermée, se liant de préférence à un site différent dans la région charnière de la structure ouverte.

Le remodelage du protéome HDL est associé à la gravité du COVID-19
Douglas Ricardo Souza Junior 31 octobre 2021

Points forts
• Le HDL participe aux réponses inflammatoires et immunitaires.
• Les altérations de la cargaison de protéines des HDL sont associées à la gravité du COVID-19.
• Le protéome HDL acquiert un profil pro-inflammatoire chez les patients hospitalisés COVID-19.
• Le protéome HDL a pu classer les sujets COVID-19 en fonction de la gravité de la maladie.

• L'APOM associé aux HDL était inversement associé aux risques de décès dus au COVID-19.

Outre le rôle bien accepté dans le métabolisme des lipides, les lipoprotéines de haute densité (HDL) semblent également participer à la réponse immunitaire de l'hôte contre les maladies infectieuses.
Objectif : Nous avons utilisé une approche protéomique quantitative pour tester l'hypothèse selon laquelle les altérations du protéome HDL sont associées à la gravité de la maladie à coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).
Méthodes
Sur la base de critères cliniques, les sujets (n=41) diagnostiqués avec COVID-19 ont été divisés en deux groupes : un groupe de sujets présentant des symptômes légers et un deuxième groupe présentant des symptômes sévères et nécessitant une hospitalisation. En utilisant une approche protéomique, nous avons quantifié les niveaux de 29 protéines dans les particules HDL dérivées de ces sujets.
Résultats
Nous avons montré que les niveaux d'amyloïde sérique A 1 et 2 (SAA1 et SAA2, respectivement), de protéine B pulmonaire associée au surfactant (SFTPB), d'apolipoprotéine F (APOF) et de chaîne lourde H4 de l'inhibiteur de l'inter-alpha-trypsine (ITIH4) étaient augmenté de plus de 50 % chez les patients hospitalisés, indépendamment du sexe, du HDL-C ou des triglycérides par rapport aux sujets ne présentant que des symptômes légers. Les protéines HDL modifiées ont pu classer les sujets COVID-19 selon la gravité de la maladie (taux d'erreur de 4,9%). De plus, l'apolipoprotéine M (APOM) dans les HDL était inversement associée aux risques de décès dus aux complications du COVID-19 (rapport de cotes [OR] pour une augmentation de 1 SD de l'APOM était de 0,27, avec un intervalle de confiance à 95 % [IC] de 0,07 à 0,72 , P=0,007).

Conclusion
Nos résultats indiquent un profond remodelage inflammatoire du suivi du protéome HDL avec la gravité de l'infection au COVID-19. Ils soulèvent également la possibilité que les particules HDL pourraient jouer un rôle important dans les maladies infectieuses.


introduction
Les sujets souffrant de la maladie à coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) présentent un large éventail de symptômes, allant des modifications du goût et de la toux sèche à la fièvre, en passant par l'essoufflement et les complications thrombotiques.1 Ils peuvent également présenter plusieurs changements cliniques, notamment une hyperinflammation2 et des lésions endothéliales. dysfonctionnement.3 Les altérations du profil lipidique, c'est-à-dire les taux de cholestérol HDL (HDL-C), de cholestérol LDL (LDL-C) et de triglycérides (TG) ont également été liées à la gravité de la maladie.4, 5, 6, 7, 8 Trois études différentes ont trouvé une corrélation inverse entre les niveaux de HDL-C et la gravité du COVID-19.5, 6, 7 De plus, les patients présentant une évolution sévère du COVID-19 avaient des niveaux de HDL-C plus bas et des taux de triglycérides plus élevés avant l'infection.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 12698
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 20 Déc 2021 21:17

Vitamin D Levels Are Associated With Blood Glucose and BMI in COVID-19 Patients, Predicting Disease Severity
Luigi di Filippo, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 107, Issue 1, January 2022, Pages e348–e360,

Context
A high prevalence of vitamin D (VD) deficiency in COVID-19 patients has been reported and hypothesized to increase COVID-19 severity likely because of its negative impact on immune and inflammatory responses. Furthermore, clear associations between hypovitaminosis D and fat body mass excess and diabetes, factors associated with COVID-19 severity, have been widely recognized.

Objective
The aim of this study was to evaluate in COVID-19 patients the relationship between VD levels and inflammatory response, body mass index (BMI), blood glucose (GLU), and disease severity.

Methods
Patients admitted to San Raffaele-Hospital for COVID-19 were enrolled in this study, excluding those with comorbidities and therapies influencing VD metabolism. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels, plasma GLU levels, BMI, and inflammatory parameters were evaluated at admission.

Results
A total of 88 patients were included. Median VD level was 16.3 ng/mL and VD deficiency was found in 68.2% of patients. VD deficiency was found more frequently in male patients and in those affected by severe COVID-19. Regression analyses showed a positive correlation between VD and PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and negative correlations between VD and plasma GLU, BMI, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, C-reactive protein, and interleukin 6. Patients with both hypovitaminosis D and diabetes mellitus, as well those with hypovitaminosis D and overweight, were more frequently affected by a severe disease with worse inflammatory response and respiratory parameters, compared to those without or just one of these conditions.

Conclusion
We showed, for the first-time, a strict association of VD levels with blood GLU and BMI in COVID-19 patients. VD deficiency might be a novel common pathophysiological mechanism involved in the detrimental effect of hyperglycemia and adiposity on disease severity.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 20 Déc 2021 21:30

Corrélations entre la vitamine D et CRP (protéine C-réactive)

Image
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 20 Déc 2021 21:31

Corrélations entre la vitamine D (VD) et la glycémie plasmatique et l'indice de masse corporelle (IMC).

Image
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 20 Déc 2021 21:38

Image
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 21 Déc 2021 17:05

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

Les niveaux de vitamine D sont associés à la glycémie et à l'IMC chez les patients COVID-19, prédisant la gravité de la maladie
Luigi di Filippo, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 107, Numéro 1, janvier 2022, Pages e348-e360,

Le contexte
Une prévalence élevée de carence en vitamine D (VD) chez les patients COVID-19 a été signalée et supposée augmenter la gravité du COVID-19 probablement en raison de son impact négatif sur les réponses immunitaires et inflammatoires. De plus, des associations claires entre l'hypovitaminose D, l'excès de masse grasse et le diabète, facteurs associés à la gravité du COVID-19, ont été largement reconnues.

Objectif
Le but de cette étude était d'évaluer chez les patients COVID-19 la relation entre les niveaux de VD et la réponse inflammatoire, l'indice de masse corporelle (IMC), la glycémie (GLU) et la gravité de la maladie.

Méthodes
Les patients admis à l'hôpital San Raffaele pour COVID-19 ont été inclus dans cette étude, à l'exclusion de ceux présentant des comorbidités et des thérapies influençant le métabolisme VD. Les taux de 25-hydroxyvitamine D, les taux plasmatiques de GLU, l'IMC et les paramètres inflammatoires ont été évalués à l'admission.

Résultats
Au total, 88 patients ont été inclus. Le niveau médian de VD était de 16,3 ng/mL et un déficit en VD a été trouvé chez 68,2 % des patients. Un déficit en VD a été trouvé plus fréquemment chez les patients de sexe masculin et chez ceux touchés par un COVID-19 sévère. Les analyses de régression ont montré une corrélation positive entre le VD et le rapport PaO2/FiO2, et des corrélations négatives entre le VD et le GLU plasmatique, l'IMC, le rapport neutrophiles/lymphocytes, la protéine C réactive et l'interleukine 6. Les patients atteints à la fois d'hypovitaminose D et de diabète sucré, ainsi que ceux atteints d'hypovitaminose D et de surpoids étaient plus fréquemment touchés par une maladie grave avec une réponse inflammatoire et des paramètres respiratoires pires, par rapport à ceux sans ou à une seule de ces conditions.

Conclusion
Nous avons montré, pour la première fois, une association stricte des niveaux de VD avec le GLU sanguin et l'IMC chez les patients COVID-19. Le déficit en VD pourrait être un nouveau mécanisme physiopathologique commun impliqué dans l'effet néfaste de l'hyperglycémie et de l'adiposité sur la gravité de la maladie.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 12698
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 27 Déc 2021 13:40

Effect of Vitamin D Deficiency on COVID-19 Status: A Systematic Review
by Pranta Das COVID 2021, 1(1), 97-104;

One major micronutrient studied for its possible protective effect against the COVID-19 disease is vitamin D. This systematic review sought to identify and synthesize available evidence to aid the understanding of the possible effect of vitamin D deficiency on COVID-19 status and health outcomes in COVID-19 patients. Three databases (PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar) were systematically used to obtain English language journal articles published between 1 December 2019 and 3 November 2020. The search consisted of the terms (“Vitamin D,” OR “25-Hydroxyvitamin D,” OR “Low vitamin D.”) AND (“COVID-19” OR “2019-nCoV” OR “Coronavirus” OR “SARS-CoV-2”) AND (“disease severity” OR “IMV” OR “ICU admission” OR “mortality” OR “hospitalization” OR “infection”). We followed the recommended PRISMA guidelines in executing this study. After going through the screening of the articles, eleven articles were included in the review. All the included studies reported a positive association between vitamin D sufficiency and improved COVID-19 disease outcomes.

On the other hand, vitamin D deficiency was associated with poor COVID-19 disease outcomes. Specifically, two studies found that vitamin D-deficient patients were more likely to die from COVID-19 compared to vitamin D-sufficient patients. Three studies showed that vitamin D-deficient people were more likely to develop severe COVID-19 disease compared to vitamin D-sufficient people. Furthermore, six studies found that vitamin D-deficient people were more likely to be COVID-19 infected compared to vitamin D-sufficient people.

Findings from these studies suggest that vitamin D may serve as a mitigating effect for COVID-19 infection, severity, and mortality. The current evidence supports the recommendations for people to eat foods rich in vitamin D such as fish, red meat, liver, and egg yolks. The evidence also supports the provision of vitamin D supplements to individuals with COVID-19 disease and those at risk of COVID-19 infection in order to boost their immunity and improve health outcomes.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 27 Déc 2021 14:23

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

Effet de la carence en vitamine D sur le statut COVID-19 : un examen systématique
par Pranta Das COVID 2021, 1 (1), 97-104 ;

Un micronutriment majeur étudié pour son effet protecteur possible contre la maladie COVID-19 est la vitamine D. Cette revue systématique a cherché à identifier et à synthétiser les preuves disponibles pour aider à comprendre l'effet possible de la carence en vitamine D sur le statut COVID-19 et les résultats de santé dans Patients COVID-19. Trois bases de données (PubMed, ScienceDirect et Google Scholar) ont été systématiquement utilisées pour obtenir des articles de revues en anglais publiés entre le 1er décembre 2019 et le 3 novembre 2020. La recherche a porté sur les termes (« Vitamin D », OU « 25-Hydroxyvitamin D », OU « Faible teneur en vitamine D. ») ET (« COVID-19 » OU « 2019-nCoV » OU « Coronavirus » OU « SARS-CoV-2 ») ET (« gravité de la maladie » OU « IMV » OU « Admission en soins intensifs » OU « mortalité » OU « hospitalisation » OU « infection »). Nous avons suivi les directives PRISMA recommandées dans l'exécution de cette étude. Après avoir passé en revue les articles, onze articles ont été inclus dans la revue. Toutes les études incluses ont rapporté une association positive entre la suffisance en vitamine D et l'amélioration des résultats de la maladie COVID-19.

D'autre part, la carence en vitamine D était associée à de mauvais résultats de la maladie COVID-19. Plus précisément, deux études ont révélé que les patients carencés en vitamine D étaient plus susceptibles de mourir du COVID-19 que les patients suffisamment en vitamine D. Trois études ont montré que les personnes carencées en vitamine D étaient plus susceptibles de développer une maladie COVID-19 sévère par rapport aux personnes suffisantes en vitamine D. En outre, six études ont révélé que les personnes carencées en vitamine D étaient plus susceptibles d'être infectées par le COVID-19 que les personnes suffisantes en vitamine D.

Les résultats de ces études suggèrent que la vitamine D peut servir d'effet d'atténuation de l'infection, de la gravité et de la mortalité du COVID-19
. Les preuves actuelles soutiennent les recommandations pour les gens de manger des aliments riches en vitamine D tels que le poisson, la viande rouge, le foie et les jaunes d'œufs. Les preuves soutiennent également la fourniture de suppléments de vitamine D aux personnes atteintes de la maladie COVID-19 et à celles à risque d'infection par COVID-19 afin de renforcer leur immunité et d'améliorer les résultats de santé.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 12698
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Conseils » 29 Déc 2021 13:46

Vitamin D and COVID-19: where are we now?
Victoria Contreras-Bolívar Postgraduate Medicine 27 Dec 2021

The pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus has triggered great interest in the search for the pathophysiological mechanisms of COVID-19 and its associated hyperinflammatory state. The presence of prognostic factors such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, obesity, and age influence the expression of the disease’s clinical severity. Other elements, such as 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D3) concentrations, are currently being studied. Various studies, mostly observational, have sought to demonstrate whether there is truly a relationship between 25(OH)D3 levels and the acquisition and/or severity of the disease. The objective of this study was to carry out a review of the current data that associate vitamin D status with the acquisition, evolution, and/or severity of infection by the SARS-CoV-2 virus and to assess whether prevention through vitamin D supplementation can prevent infection and/or improve the evolution once acquired.

Vitamin D system has an immunomodulatory function and plays a significant role in various bacterial and viral infections. The immune function of vitamin D is explained in part by the presence of its receptor (VDR) and its activating enzyme 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) in immune cells. The vitamin D, VDR, and Retinoid X Receptor complex allows the transcription of genes with antimicrobial activities[b][/b], such as cathelicidins and defensins.

COVID-19 characteristically presents a marked hyperimmune state, with the release of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Thus, there are biological factors linking vitamin D to the cytokine storm, which can herald some of the most severe consequences of COVID-19, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Hypovitaminosis D is widespread worldwide, so the prevention of COVID-19 through vitamin D supplementation is being considered as a possible therapeutic strategy easy to implement. However, more-quality studies and well-designed randomized clinical trials are needed to address this relevant question.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Conseils
Forum Admin
 
Messages: 54373
Inscription: 11 Sep 2008 19:11

Re: Vitamine D et virus?

Messagepar Nutrimuscle-Diététique » 30 Déc 2021 18:26

Traduction de l'étude :wink:

Vitamine D et COVID-19 : où en sommes-nous maintenant ?
Victoria Contreras-Bolívar Médecine postdoctorale 27 décembre 2021

La pandémie causée par le virus SARS-CoV-2 a suscité un grand intérêt dans la recherche des mécanismes physiopathologiques du COVID-19 et de son état hyperinflammatoire associé. La présence de facteurs pronostiques tels que le diabète, les maladies cardiovasculaires, l'hypertension, l'obésité et l'âge influencent l'expression de la sévérité clinique de la maladie. D'autres éléments, comme les concentrations de 25-hydroxyvitamine D (25(OH)D3), sont actuellement à l'étude. Diverses études, pour la plupart observationnelles, ont cherché à démontrer s'il existe vraiment une relation entre les taux de 25(OH)D3 et l'acquisition et/ou la sévérité de la maladie. L'objectif de cette étude était de passer en revue les données actuelles qui associent le statut en vitamine D à l'acquisition, l'évolution et/ou la gravité de l'infection par le virus SARS-CoV-2 et d'évaluer si la prévention par la supplémentation en vitamine D peut prévenir l'infection et/ou améliorer l'évolution une fois acquise.

Le système de vitamine D a une fonction immunomodulatrice et joue un rôle important dans diverses infections bactériennes et virales. La fonction immunitaire de la vitamine D s'explique en partie par la présence de son récepteur (VDR) et de son enzyme activatrice 25-hydroxyvitamine D-1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) dans les cellules immunitaires. Le complexe vitamine D, VDR et Retinoid X Receptor permet la transcription de gènes ayant des activités antimicrobiennes, tels que les cathélicidines et les défensines.

Le COVID-19 présente de manière caractéristique un état hyperimmun marqué, avec la libération de cytokines pro-inflammatoires telles que l'IL-6, le TNF-α et l'IL-1β. Ainsi, il existe des facteurs biologiques liant la vitamine D à la tempête de cytokines, qui peuvent annoncer certaines des conséquences les plus graves du COVID-19, telles que le syndrome de détresse respiratoire aiguë.

L'hypovitaminose D étant répandue dans le monde entier, la prévention du COVID-19 par la supplémentation en vitamine D est considérée comme une éventuelle stratégie thérapeutique facile à mettre en œuvre. Cependant, des études de meilleure qualité et des essais cliniques randomisés bien conçus sont nécessaires pour répondre à cette question pertinente.
Avatar de l’utilisateur
Nutrimuscle-Diététique
 
Messages: 12698
Inscription: 4 Mar 2013 09:39
Localisation: Athus

PrécédenteSuivante

Retourner vers Actualités, vidéos, études scientifiques

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: waterwolf et 7 invités